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Secret Of The Perfect Squat – Widen Your Stance

Squatting narrow to target that perfect “tear drop” vastus medialis is a waste. It’s time to use a squat stance that builds a better all-around body.

Squats are a staple of any sound weightlifting program. Whether goblet, front, or back squats, the value of this classic exercise is undoubted, not only in terms of quadriceps growth but also functional capacity in life. That's why what I'm about to say might sound like blasphemy: It's time to rethink the way we squat.

Most squats you see in gyms today are performed with the feet planted at shoulder-width or narrower. These types of squats give a good burn to the quadriceps, and some people use varying narrow stances to target specific areas on the quads. But squats are a movement, not a specific muscle developer. The entire body should be activated in the lift, and especially the posterior chain and core.

Taking a wider stance than shoulder-width has been shown to provide the same level of quad activation as a traditional "narrow" stance, but squatting wide also provides distinct advantages.

A wide stance works a greater number of muscles. Go wide, and you'll feel it in your glutes, your overall strength, and maybe in the back and knee pain you don't feel.

Go Wide, Young Man

Perhaps a better question to ask is "Why go narrow?" It could be argued that the narrow squat better mimics life applications, but the goal with a wide stance is muscular development and strength. There's always room in life for more strength.

If you decide to step out, you will notice the benefits:

1/
Glute Activation

If you want to think of squats as "developing" a certain muscle, it's better to think of the glutes than the quads.

The glutes are a tremendous source of power and strength, and if you can use their strength in a movement, you almost always should.

Take a wider stance when squatting, such as 140-150 percent of shoulder width. This allows for greater posterior displacement of the hips.

This displacement activates the glutes to a greater degree than narrow squats when depth is reached, according to research from the University of Abertay, in Dundee, Scotland.

A study at the University of Padova in Italy took the conclusion a step further, suggesting that "a large width is necessary for a greater activation of the gluteus maximus during back squats."

2/
Quadriceps Activation

Much of the popularity for narrow-stance squats is based on personal opinion and "feel." This is understandable. We train because we enjoy the challenge and the burn. We're taught that pain leads to success. A wider stance might not stimulate the same feeling on your quadriceps, but the activity is there.

The University of Padova study concluded that a wide stance produces the same muscular activation as a narrow stance in the quads, adductor major, vastus medialis and lateralis-everywhere but the glutes.

Make no mistake: Changing the stance changes the movement. Narrow stances require an anterior tracking of the knee, and while this is not inherently a bad movement, it does place a greater stress on the knee. Over time, the recessive forces exerted on the knee could lead to patellar tendon strains or tendonitis.

By comparison, reaching squat depth with a wide stance requires a lifter to maintain a more vertical shin position than a narrow stance. This stance places far less stress on the knee.

3/
Ankle Mobility

The narrow range of motion of the human ankle can be a limiting factor when performing a narrow-stance squat. A wider stance alleviates this issue by maintaining a more vertical shin position, providing an easier trip to reach depth.

Of course you could and should address your tight calves and lower legs with mobility drills and foam rolling, but there's no reason you should limit your squatting pattern just because you can't reach depth in a narrow stance. Bump those feet out!

4/
Power Production

Power is what we're after, right? It is the heart of athletics, and no matter the activity, powerful players perform well. By activating more muscle fiber, and different muscle groups, wide squats provide a clear advantage for hypertrophic gains which can transfer to competitive athletics.

Wide squats are also more powerful, period. A recent study published in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning found that the squat power produced at 150 percent of shoulder-width was "significantly higher" than at 50 percent width, 100 percent, or at 200 percent.

This raises an important point: Some argue that ultra-wide stances such as 200 percent have value in geared lifting, but they are not generally thought to be best for power development.

It's All in the Hips

Hip strength and function have recently been getting much-needed attention in strength and conditioning programs. More trainers are emphasizing movements rather than muscles in an all-encompassing approach to training.

This is a fantastic way to combat the quad dominance and glute weakness that plague sedentary populations. Wide squats allow for more comprehensive movement that better works the hips than traditional squats.

The hips are multidirectional joints, producing force in three planes of motion. The wide-stance squat provides the best option to train the hips in all three planes. The wide movement exhibits greater hip flexion and smaller plantarflexion angles than narrow-stance squats. It also produces significantly larger hip extension movements.

Wide-stance squats are achieved with a posterior tracking of the hips, which leads to greater hip extension to return the bar to the original position. Wide squats have been shown to produce greater abduction and adduction, with greater internal and external rotation of the femur during the lift than narrow squats.

Spreading movement across all three planes of motion helps to create a stable hip joint that can handle a tremendous amount of stress, not only in the gym but also in life.

Save Your Spine

Some argue that the horizontal positioning of the torso during a wide stance squat creates larger loads on the lumbar, as compared to a narrow stance. This is believed to increase the risk for low-back injuries. Recent studies do not support this conclusion.

When performing a narrow squat, the distance to parallel is greater than in a wide squat. Reaching depth in a narrow squat requires tucking the lumbar under the torso to facilitate hip flexion. The resulting flexion of the spine under a load puts pressure on the L5/S1 area, which could be linked to bulging discs and other spinal complications.

This is not to say that a traditional squat will cause low-back injury, but without consistent development in this squatting pattern, the greater force placed on the spine can take a toll over time. The posterior movement of the hips in a wide stance can contribute to a more neutral back positioning without tucking your lumbar.

A wider stance also recruits more muscles to perform the task, and is a more encompassing movement compared to a narrow stance. The goal of any compound lift should be engaging as many muscles as possible, and it is clear that a wider stance better accomplishes this task.


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samodeo44

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samodeo44

exactly.. everybody always criticizes me for keeping my feet wide on squats and didn't believe me that they were easier to go parallel.

Aug 20, 2012 4:46pm | report
apbursley

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apbursley

Preach it

Aug 20, 2012 4:48pm | report
simity

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simity

I've had a buldging L5/S1 disc before I started working out. I'll make sure I never do narrow stance squats now for sure.

Aug 20, 2012 6:55pm | report
mitchellvenable

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mitchellvenable

I was taught to do squats this way being that i'm so tall. It feels so much more natural for me...especially for my knees!

Aug 20, 2012 7:34pm | report
anthonyinoa

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anthonyinoa

i use to hate squats, now is my second favorite exercise, am gonna try this wide stance to see if its better .

Aug 20, 2012 8:53pm | report
chuck2334

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chuck2334

I feel like I have more power an more ROM when my feet are like 1-2" wider than my shoulders. But that's the good part about bodybuilding is that everyone figures out what works best for them. Still useful information.

Aug 20, 2012 8:59pm | report
DrewG74

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DrewG74

i'll give it a try and see if it works. I am used to the shoulder width stance and it is hard on my lower back! having a long fractured left ankle which severely limits my ROM and I have to use weights on under my heels!

Aug 20, 2012 9:09pm | report
brettster44

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brettster44

I have always been able to squat a lot more weight with a wide stance

Article Rated:
Aug 20, 2012 11:16pm | report
DrewG74

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DrewG74

Martial Artists have known for millenia that a wide stance promotes better ROM, posture, and weight bearing loads. As a martial artist I agree with that and disagree with the theory that a narrow stance produces a more tucked hip. if you look at any competant martial artist we tuck our hips foward to align the spine for optimal weight bearing and energy transfer (internal and external) as possible. a tucked hip strengthens the all the abs and obligues as well. if you doubt what I say chech out Ba Gua Zhang masters. The art centers around tucked hips, rounded yet aligned backs and is also know in sub sets as Tai Chi Chuang, Iron Shirt Kung Fu, among others. a tucked hip is essential for proper alignment of hips and spine and support of everyday and heavy weights.

Aug 21, 2012 12:31am | report
damaz

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damaz

great article legs tomorrow looks like i will be trying this makes sense in every way

Aug 21, 2012 1:42am | report
  • Body Stats
  • ht: 15'11"
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over40dad

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over40dad

Tried wide squats for leg workout this morning.
Much less stress on my lower back and knees. I will be sticking with this way of doing squats. I got a much deeper squat and was able to go heavier.

Aug 21, 2012 3:01am | report
teslation

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teslation

veru usefull thank u

Aug 21, 2012 3:12am | report
perkinsid

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perkinsid

Being 6'3" and having proportianally long legs, wider squats are definately more difficult but for sure will show more improvement.

Aug 21, 2012 6:15am | report
GinoMontana

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GinoMontana

i have very big and powerfull legs and I never did wide squats. I'll try this in my high rep phase.

Aug 21, 2012 7:25am | report
EjnarKolinkar

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EjnarKolinkar

Great article! I stick to wider stance and shoot for ATG over narrow and shallow. I squatted shallower and narrower in my youth because I was under educated. I feel much stronger and safer with my long femurs with my glutes sharing the load, and better knee position.

Aug 21, 2012 7:45am | report
jwethall

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jwethall

I've actually started squatting wider as of late. I used to squat at about shoulder width, feet forward to hit my vastus lateralis which WAS a lagging area(no more). I felt alot of tightness in my ITB and hips, and my knees did get some wear.

I don't go as wide as the cage now, but I do step a couple inches outside of shoulder width and it has made a big difference in alleviating pain in those areas. Flat shoes or bare feet is a must on squats as well.

Aug 21, 2012 9:30am | report
jamesw42

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jamesw42

i do wide stance squats and i felt i was not hitting my quads. i am glad i came across this article. if i do raised heel squats will that isolate my quads more versus flat heels?

Aug 21, 2012 9:51am | report
trainerfitpro

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trainerfitpro

I recommend front squats to isolate your quads more. Anytime you raise your heels it puts your pressure forward onto your knees... imo.

Oct 21, 2012 4:24pm | report
Rudice

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Rudice

this is one of the best articles i have

Aug 21, 2012 4:33pm | report
Michelle_Rose

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Michelle_Rose

knees out. KNEES OUT ! :)

Sep 2, 2012 12:02pm | report
Mrobe

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Mrobe

Great article. I only have one thing to point out. Never being an expert, and always willing to hear the counter to this, I don't think the toes should point outward, in that, the position becomes too difficult to keep the strain from the medial aspect of the knee joint. The initial movement of the squat is to drive the heels into the floor, and unless they are pointed straight forward, the drive force is placed on the edges of the foot, whether that be medial or lateral... Hey, just something to think about, especially if you are pushing a heavy load... thanks again for a great article.

Sep 2, 2012 1:35pm | report
p17067

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p17067

I see your point. I think there should be some external rotation of your feet as it does help with your knees tracking properly, especially with heavy weight. As far as how much external rotation, I think it's up to the athlete and what feels comfortable. Good article!

Sep 3, 2012 10:25pm | report
FelixGuyer

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FelixGuyer

I found this to be the case by my own accord when i was experimenting with the variations of squats. The section about it feeling like a more powerful squat is sooo TRUE!
Phenomenal Article. Many Many Thanks for the researched information. Very handy and interesting to know. cheers

Sep 2, 2012 1:56pm | report
CaptainScarlet

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CaptainScarlet

Good to know that,thanks

Sep 2, 2012 2:04pm | report
deepkick

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deepkick

I have always done both wider and narrower stance squats on my two leg days, I just thought it would put more of the focus on different areas of my quads. turns out its even better, thanks, great article

Sep 4, 2012 11:41pm | report
Showing 1 - 25 of 40 Comments

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