Like so many athletes of the modern age, Craig Capurso reached a point in his life when he could no longer play the sport of his youth. Craig was a football player. Now he is a fitness model, competing in the Physique Division of the IFBB.

The sport switch coincided with a training switch. No longer is he consumed by "Bigger, Faster, Stronger," but instead he pursues fitness like a Brahma bull.



"I adapted a new style of heavy volume," Capurso said. "It's not so much bodybuilder-style, but more fitness-style. I'm doing little rest. I'm trying to push as much weight as I can, but I'll go into the gym randomly and be like, 'I'm doing 100 reps of this exercise.' How I get there, I don't even know."

No 2-week stretch is safe from Craig's variable manipulation. It's 100 reps followed by superset followed by a day working the trade floor at the NYMEX.

"It's about being spontaneous, and it's about agility," Capurso said. "I'm always exerting my body as much as I can. I'll worry about the next set when I have to worry about the next set."

Craig Capurso's Fitness Program

Watch The Video - 12:35

Cardio isn't the devil, nor is it some altar for ritualistic sacrifice. Craig uses boxing training techniques, which promote both heart health and power.

"I'm a fitness guy; I'm going to be agile," Capurso said. "I will do jumps. I'll run around the gym. I'll do lunges. I will be training hard; you will see me sweat."

Craig's Training Philosophy

The gym is my second home. It is a place where a bad day can turn good. You may call it my church or sanctuary. I go to throw around some weights and try to expand every muscle fiber in that working muscle group.



I have trained as an athlete under the principles of bigger, stronger, faster which has created a great base. I am able now to fine-tune those muscles and work on my weakness in order to showcase a more aesthetic physique.

You have to build the foundation from the ground up. Legs are by far my biggest body part and my favorite to train. Work all your muscle groups in order to be the complete package. Nothing looks more ridiculous than someone who has large upper body and no lower body or vice versa. I am now building my body with my new training strategy of HEAVY VOLUME. I used to train heavy for low reps but found I would get strong but not sore.

I know when I am sore that I did some damage to those muscles, and I will have to work harder next week to increase my lactic acid threshold. This is the part of the process where you break down muscles in order to repair to grow. That's what you should all be after; remember, there is no scale or weight on stage.

Best Body Part: I've always had big quads. I feel like I have a good base. I have a good back from the power exercises I've done in the past. My training method over the years has built a certain physique, but now I'm getting judged on everything. You have to bring everything into a certain aesthetic.

Worst Body Part: Calves are my worst! I gotta start doing them more. I have to start putting those into my routine on a regular basis. I kind of neglect them. Calves are my red-headed stepchild, but they need to start being my main son in this relationship.

Craig's Training Regimen

Training Rules

  • 2-3 minutes rest between exercises unless designated superset.
  • Supersets: Complete 1st exercise, immediately follow with 2nd exercise (no rest), then rest 2-3 minutes before repeating.
  • I do not have a set time in gym; the workout lasts as long as the work lasts.
  • I do not add cardio until a month out from a show, in which case I do 30 minutes walking on incline 2 days per week, followed by a treadmill incline variation: 2 min walk, 1 minute sprint, 30 seconds rest, repeated for 30 minutes.

Heavy Volume

  • Pick a weight for the first set that you can get 15, but maybe not 16 reps.
  • This should be your weight for all sets.
  • Follow multiple sets until failure until you hit the desired number of reps (ex. 100).
  • Most likely you'll need 3 minutes rest between sets.
Day 1: Chest Day
1
Dumbbell Bench Press
1 set, 100 reps (heavy volume)
2
Superset
4 sets
Butterfly
4 sets, to failure
Svend Press
4 sets, to failure (2-count pause at extension )
3
Superset
4 sets
Wide-Grip Decline Barbell Pullover
or perform with Dumbbells.
4 sets, 12 reps
Pushups
4 sets, to failure
Day 2: Back Day
1
Lying T-Bar Row
1 set, 100 reps (heavy volume)
2
Superset
4 sets
Seated Cable Rows
4 sets, 20 reps (Flat bar, Reverse grip)
Wide-Grip Lat Pulldown
4 sets, 20 reps
3
Superset
4 sets
Seated Bent-Over Rear Delt Raise
4 sets, to failure
Pullups
4 sets, to failure (Switch grip, begin wide-grip and move in each set)
Day 3: Leg Day
1
Barbell Squat
1 set, 100 reps (Heavy Volume)
2
Dumbbell Lunges
5 sets, 12 reps (alternating legs)
3
Superset
5 sets
Sumo Deadlift
5 sets, 12 reps
Seated Calf Raise
5 sets, 12 reps
4
Leg Press
3 sets, 25 reps
Day 4: Shoulders Day
1
Dumbbell Shoulder Press
1 set, 100 reps (heavy volume)
2
Superset
4 sets
Standing Front Barbell Raise Over Head
with EZ-Bar.
4 sets, 12 reps
Cable Seated Lateral Raise
4 sets, 12 reps
3
Superset
4 sets
Upright Barbell Row
4 sets, 12 reps
Front Plate Raise
with Steering Wheel Turns.
4 sets, 15-20 reps
Day 5: Arm Day
Note: Full range of motion and squeeze the weight, don't just lift it.
1
Triceps Pushdown - Rope Attachment
Warm-up.
2 sets, 25 reps
2
Superset
5 sets
Lying Triceps Press
5 sets, 12 reps
Dumbbell Alternate Bicep Curl
5 sets, 12 reps
3
Superset
4 sets
Weighted Bench Dip
4 sets, 15 reps
Barbell Curl
4 sets, 15 reps
4
Superset
4 sets
Tricep Dumbbell Kickback
4 sets, 12 reps
Incline Hammer Curls
4 sets, 12 reps
Day 6: Abs/Calves Day
Note: No rest for all supersets, even after a completed set.
1
Superset
4 sets
Hanging Leg Raise
4 sets, 15 reps
Seated Calf Raise
4 sets, 20 reps
2
Superset
4 sets
Decline Reverse Crunch
4 sets, 15 reps
Standing Calf Raises
4 sets, 20 reps
3
Superset
4 sets
Cable Crunch
4 sets, 15 reps
Donkey Calf Raises
4 sets, 20 reps

Day 7: Rest Day

[ Craig Capurso's Fitness Program ][



About the Author

Dustin Lapray

Dustin Lapray

Dustin Lapray is a writer, journalist, and editor living in Boise, Idaho.

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