Bodybuilding.com Information Motivation Supplementation
in:
Alex Carneiro
acarneiro

8 Fat-Loss Blunders

Struggling to burn off those extra pounds? Here are the reasons you're
not losing fat.

Fat-Loss Blunders: 8 Reasons You're Not Losing Body Fat

Countless people are in the gym to cut body fat, but not everybody succeeds. If you're having trouble dropping weight, you might be committing one of these fat-loss fatalities!

Many of us spend years and years trying to get rid of extra body fat with little or no success. We yo-yo and ride the diet rollercoaster, with too much "roll" along the way. We attack our fat when motivation is high, but we still crumble at the sight of warm cookies. Unfortunately, this stilted progress results in many unfinished New Year's resolutions and dissatisfied gym clients. Fat loss might be the most common fitness goal, but it's definitely no easy task to achieve.

If you've been playing the fat-burning fight for a long time and have yet to win a round, it's probably because you're making one or more of the mistakes below. I'll help you avoid these common fat-loss slip-ups so you can get back in the game!

MISTAKE 1 You eat too much

I know this seems like an obvious mistake, but many people truly don't know how many calories they're actually eating. For example, ordering a salad might seem like a healthy choice, but you could be getting a 600-calorie meal without even realizing it. Sauces, dressing, ketchup, and oils all have calories you probably don't even think about. Especially if you don't regularly cook at home, you're probably eating more calories than you think.

We're told over and over that the simple weight-loss process is to eat fewer calories than you expend throughout the day. However, this "calories in, calories out" methodology oversimplifies matters. Hypothetically, this system would work if you ate 1,500 calories worth of cheesecake per day and burned 2,000, but the human body isn't a calculator. The type of calories you eat matters. A carbohydrate-only diet will not help you reach your fat-loss goals. You need the right combination of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats to build muscle and burn fat.

For most people, a 40/40/20 ratio works great. If 40 percent of your food comes from carbs, 40 percent from protein, and 20 percent from fat, the stage is set for positive change. However, that ratio is not the golden rule for all body types and goals. Do research and find what works best for you.

"Ordering a salad might seem like a healthy choice, but sauces, dressing, ketchup, and oils all have calories you might forget."

Many people have to drop their carbs even lower to burn fat successfully. If you do, make sure you boost your fat intake at least slightly to give your body an alternative energy source.

MISTAKE 2 You don't eat enough protein

Protein does more than just build and repair muscle tissue. A 2003 study published in "Journal of Nutrition" found that, even though two groups of overweight women consumed an identical number of calories, the group whose members consumed a diet including 128 grams of protein per day lost more weight than members of the group consuming 68 grams of protein.1

Protein increases satiety at meals, which can help you help you feel less hungry and therefore eat less throughout the day. High-protein diets can also have positive results on the body's blood lipids, glucose levels, and muscle-to-fat ratios.

"Protein increases satiety at meals, which can help you feel less hungry and therefore eat less throughout the day."

Protein is a great fat-loss macro, but don't think that you'll see quick results simply by adding some shakes to your diet. Fat-loss takes consistent dedication to the right nutrition plan for your goals. Choose high-protein foods at every major meal—especially instead of carb-laden options—and you'll see results over time.

MISTAKE 3 You drink too much

The only liquid your body really needs is water. Sure you can have coffee, tea, and sometimes milk, but a steady stream of sugary beverages will undermine fat-loss. That pumpkin spice latte you love so much can easily have more than 300 calories! If you're drinking an additional 300 calories every morning, you're doing your body a disservice. Losing fat can be difficult enough, so don't make it any harder.

Booze can also make you lose the fat-loss war. A beer every once in a while won't hurt you, but it's imperative that you stop indulging in weekend binges. Alcoholic beverages are usually high in calories that your body just stores as fat, but just as crucially, it also impairs your judgment. So instead of making healthy food choices, your booze-brain will tell you that a big plate of nachos is the right choice.

MISTAKE 4 You think healthy food is calorie-free

It doesn't matter how healthy any particular food is; if you eat too much of it, you'll have a hard time losing fat. Of course it's important to eat whole foods, but overeating non-GMO, fair-trade, organic peanut butter is still overeating.

Two prime examples of healthy foods that run huge calorie tabs are nuts and seeds. The omegas, micronutrients, and phytogens in these "superfoods" are wonderful for your health, but the calories they carry can be excessive. This doesn't mean you should avoid them, but rather, when you pick up some almonds to snack on, don't eat multiple handfuls.

Of course it's important to eat whole foods, but overeating non-GMO, fair-trade, organic peanut butter is still overeating.

One ounce is difficult to measure, so limit yourself to about 10 almonds. Although the fat in almonds is good, it's better to fill up on micronutrient-dense foods, like green vegetables, that don't pack a lot of calories.

MISTAKE 5 You don't train intensely enough

"If fat-loss is your goal, you have to create an extreme energy demand so your body can change."

Beginners should start slowly. However, as you grow accustomed to the weights, machines, and the gym atmosphere, you have to push harder and harder. You can't get comfortable, or you will plateau.

I can't tell you how many times I've seen women curl 5-pound dumbbells without breaking a sweat the entire workout. When I ask them why they don't lift heavier, they usually answer, "I don't want to get bulky." Man or woman, you have to lift hard and heavy, and the reason has nothing to do with getting huge!

If fat-loss is your goal, you have to create an extreme energy demand so your body can change. Lifting the same light weights day after day will not help you do this or meet any of your other physique goals.

MISTAKE 6 You're doing too much low-intensity cardio

I know, you're probably thinking to yourself, "Didn't he just tell me to train more intensely? Now he's telling me I'm doing too much of something strenuous! What's the big idea?" Well, cardio is not resistance training. It trains an entirely different aspect of the fitness spectrum. Don't expect a two-hour treadmill slog to produce the same results as an intense hour of heavy lifting.

If you want to perform cardio that will do you some good, make some of your workouts full-body workouts with short rest periods. By incorporating your whole body and shortening the rest periods, you'll challenge your cardiovascular system as well as your muscular system. That means more bang for your training buck.

MISTAKE 7 You're stressed

Stress is the silent killer. When you get stressed, your body produces cortisol above and beyond the norm. Chronically elevated cortisol can be responsible for increased body fat storage and other negative consequences. Even if your diet and training are perfect, excessive stress can keep you from achieving those fat-loss goals.

Relax! Although that might be easier said than done, applying relaxation techniques to your day can have a big impact on your physique and overall health. Try yoga, take a bath, read a book, see a movie, or invest in 10-15 minutes of simple meditation.

MISTAKE 8 You don't sleep enough

Like stress, sleep deprivation elevates cortisol, a fat-loss no-no. When you're short on sleep, your insulin sensitivity also decreases. Combined, these problems create a less-than-optimal fat-loss environment to say the least.

To reach your physique or fitness goals, prioritize sleep. You can't party all night, pass out for a couple hours, work the next day, and expect your body to respond positively. Shoot for at least 8 hours of sleep per night. Limit your use of electronics before bed, don't drink caffeine in the evenings, and give yourself some wind-down time to help you hit this target.

References
  1. Layman DK, Boileau RA, Erickson DJ, Painter JE, Shiue H, Sather C, Christou DD. A reduced ratio of dietary carbohydrate to protein improves body composition and blood lipid profiles during weight loss in adult women. J Nutr. 2003 Feb; 133(2): 411-7.

Related Articles

About The Author

Alex is an IFBB Physique pro and Optimum Nutrition sponsored athlete from Brazil. He currently operates his training business from his home.

RATE THIS ARTICLE
POOR
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
EXCELLENT
OVERALL RATING
9.2

Out of 10
Excellent
873 Ratings

218

Comments

Showing 1 - 25 of 218 Comments

(5 characters minimum)

      • notify me when users reply to my comment
donmiller212

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
donmiller212

glad to see an accurate article.

Jan 6, 2014 7:11pm | report
 
acarneiro

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
acarneiro

Thanks my man!

Jan 7, 2014 11:01am | report
extremedrummer87

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
extremedrummer87

Very good simple article. Nails it.

Jan 6, 2014 8:40pm | report
 
acarneiro

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
acarneiro

Glad you liked it!

Jan 7, 2014 11:03am | report
gmoneync

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
gmoneync

Well written! Thx

Article Rated:
Jan 6, 2014 9:34pm | report
 
acarneiro

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
acarneiro

that's great to hear as english is not my first language

Jan 7, 2014 11:03am | report
reftis

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
reftis

A comment regarding "mistake 3". If the 2 women ate the same amount of calories each day, then the "satiety factor is irrelevant for fat loss. The whole logic behind this statement is false.

What you can state though: eating foods with a high satiety/calories are great choices if you want to lose weight period. If you are counting calories and are strict about it, it does not really matter.

Jan 6, 2014 11:15pm | report
 
ainigma

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
ainigma

Yes, if you look at the numbers, your idea would probably work. However, as a woman, I can tell you from experience, a 100 calorie bowl of salad is not the same as a 100 calorie cup of plain non-fat, plenty of protein Greek yogurt... No matter how strict I am with counting calories, some foods just keep my stomach quiet for longer, and those are the foods that I prefer. Otherwise, a growling stomach will send me right into mistake #5...

Jan 7, 2014 5:07am | report
samerym

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
samerym

Actually there's something much more important: 20 percent of the calories in protein are used to digest it, compared with 8% for carbs and 2% for fat.

Jan 7, 2014 9:06am | report
saxon1978

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
saxon1978

Not true.
With low calorie diet you can burn 2kg a week.
I am on 1500 kcal and 30 mins per day cardio and i am loosing enough fat.
1-1,5 kg per week.

Jan 7, 2014 1:59pm | report
DaKman

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
DaKman

Saxon you're at an incredible deficit if you weigh 230 and are only eating 1500 cals plus doing 3.5 hours of relatively intense cardio a week in addition to a strength training regimen. You might want to dial that back a bit unless you're not concerned about losing a good deal of muscle as well.

Jan 8, 2014 12:52am | report
reftis

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
reftis

Enigma you have obviously not understood the point i am tryin to make. Satiety or "fullness in the stomach" per calorie is what counts. Of course you wont be equally full on 100 kcals of sugar and 100kcals of beef. That is the satiety/calorie ratio im speaking of.

Good insights about the amount off Energy needed to metabolize different nutrients. This obviously also need to be taken into your calorie count.

Jan 8, 2014 5:17am | report
davidwhoa

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
davidwhoa

Reftis...I beleive you're actually referring to mistake 2, not eating enough protein, and maybe you're not understanding. The first point is that a greater proportion of protein, with equal total calorie consumption resulted in greater fat loss. This is a fact, supported by a study published in the journal of nutrition...not an oppinion. The statement about satiety is not a supporting statement to that paragraph, rather a second point in itself about the further benefits of a high protein diet. I hope this helps.

Jan 8, 2014 12:17pm | report
dominicanhulk

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
dominicanhulk

david you clarified this with proven facts, thats always a great thing to see

Jan 9, 2014 7:22am | report
bronwynbiro

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
bronwynbiro

Love this!

Jan 6, 2014 11:18pm | report
 
darkblueboss

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
darkblueboss

Great Article....

Jan 7, 2014 12:48am | report
 
rbouscher

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
rbouscher

So true, glad legit information is here.

Jan 7, 2014 2:02am | report
 
mtbkr

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
mtbkr

Great article :)

Jan 7, 2014 2:24am | report
 
faiznmatazzz

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
faiznmatazzz

Thank you for helping us! :)

Article Rated:
Jan 7, 2014 3:23am | report
 
PrimalChange

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
PrimalChange

Perfect article explaining all the reason why I've failed with nutrition and weight loss in the past. Consistency is another area

Jan 7, 2014 3:32am | report
 
  • Body Stats
  • ht: 5'10"
  • wt: 173.28 lbs
  • bf: 18.0%
PrimalChange

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
PrimalChange

Perfect article explaining all the reason why I've failed with nutrition and weight loss in the past. Consistency is another area

Jan 7, 2014 3:32am | report
 
  • Body Stats
  • ht: 5'10"
  • wt: 173.28 lbs
  • bf: 18.0%
Ulfit

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
Ulfit

Nice article. Thanks!

But I have some doubts regarding the amount of protein you suggest.
I've read some articles stating the need to base a fat-loss diet around protein but I've also read some well based articles stating that more than 1g of protein per lb of bw is not necessary. What is your opinion on this last statement?

Jan 7, 2014 4:41am | report
 
  • Body Stats
  • ht: 5'11"
  • wt: 190.74 lbs
  • bf: 19.2%
JonahTheMan

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
JonahTheMan

You have to take into account the way that the body deals with different macro nutrients. Over a certain point, too much protein really can be considered a waste because you're spending quite a bit of money on something relatively more expensive for little to no extra benefit. There are a few reasons more grams of protein are important.

1. Thermic effect of protein on the body- protein can take 20% and up to 30% of the calories consumed breaking down the amino acids, this is a huge benefit when someone is trying to lose weight. Fat is one of the most efficient macros at being broken down, it it taken up in the small intestine without much effort at all. Carbohydrates are necessary in terms of the types of carbs. The wrong carbs in amounts too large can influence the storage of fat on your body.

2. Nitrogen balance. Most people losing weight would prefer to maintain all their muscle. I've never met a person who has said they want to lose weight aka fat, who didn't care where that weight was coming from. Everyone wants to preserve muscle and lose fat. Nitrogen balance is key in maintaining muscle. .8 grams/ kg of body weight is needed to maintain positive nitrogen balance. 1-1.8 grams/kg of body weight is needed to maintain positive nitrogen balance. http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/drobson75.htm Read the part on nitrogen balance, it is important for weight loss unless you want want to fight an uphill battle of losing weight both precious earned muscle and stubborn fat.

3. Effect of protein on testosterone. The amount of protein we eat, especially lean protein affects our body's testosterone levels. Now, increased testosterone levels within the normal range won't particularly effect your muscle protein synthesis. But it will affect your body's ability to burn fat. One of testosterone's job's is to induce protein synthesis and and one of other awesome things that it does is induce lypolysis. In other words increasing your protein can help your body, through testosterone to burn more lipids, aka body fat!

Your comment about needing more than 1gram of per pound of weight, is true. That is really not needed. The issue comes in when you are trying to decide where else to get the calories you need.

Jan 7, 2014 10:56pm | report
fabulousfemale

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
fabulousfemale

Good, good information I'll be sure to pass it along to some of my hard-headed co-workers but even then they'll still feel that they know what's best :)

Jan 7, 2014 4:58am | report
 
dominicanhulk

Rep Power: 0

  • rep this user
dominicanhulk

lol They probably still wont listen as mine sure dont but i guess its worth a shot.

Jan 9, 2014 7:26am | report
Showing 1 - 25 of 218 Comments

Featured Product

Give Us Feedback:
Report A Problem
Site Feedback
Follow Us:
Twitter
Facebook
RSS Feeds
Bodybuilding.com Newsletter

Receive exciting features,
news & special offers from Bodybuilding.com