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The Keto Diet: A Low-Carb Approach To Fat Loss.

The TKD Diet: What Is It And Who Benefits?

The principle behind this diet is very similar to a CKD, only you are going to consume carbohydrates before and after your weight training. Learn what the TKD diet is and who can benefit.

Part 1 | Part 2

In part one of this article we looked at what the cyclical keto diet was and how it would apply to those individuals who exercised regularly. A traditional keto diet is based solely around the consumption of protein and fat while keeping carbohydrate intake to a bare minimum.

In a CKD though (cyclic keto diet), you implement periods of higher carb eating called refeeds, usually once per week, in an effort to supply your body with the muscle glycogen it needs in order to keep performing the higher intensity work you are asking from it. This requires a carefully planned out depletion workout beforehand however and strict adherence to doing very low carb eating for the entire rest of the week.

Others may want to use some of the principles of the keto diet in their own lives but do not want to completely cut out carbohydrates every day. This is where the targeted keto diet or TKD comes in.

The Targeted Keto Diet

The principle behind this diet is very similar to that of a CKD only you are going to consume carbohydrates right before and after your weight training workouts. This will give your body the energy it needs to lift with a higher volume and at a higher intensity level.

Athletes who are involved in high intensity sprinting exercises will also likely want to use a TKD approach as this type of exercise does require carbohydrates in the system beforehand if you hope to produce optimal results.

Sprinting on a low carbohydrate diet is generally not something most people should be doing, particularly if they are taking in a low number of calories on top of everything (people who are maintaining or trying to gain weight on a CKD may try sprinting, but it still isn't going to be as easy to do in comparison to someone who is consuming a standard, more moderate carbohydrate intake).

Setting Up A TKD

To set up a TKD diet, follow the same procedure in terms of protein intake as a CKD, allowing for one gram of protein per pound of body weight. Then determine the number of calories of carbohydrates you wish to consume before and after your workouts.

PROTEIN CALCULATOR
Weight
Results
Protein

Generally an intake of 0.33 grams of carbs per pound of body weight is recommended (so 40-80 grams for most people) for each meal however you may want to increase or decrease this depending on your particular goals (those who are trying to lose body fat may decrease while those who are trying to gain muscle may want to increase).

CARB CALCULATOR
Weight
Results
Carbs

After you have figured out the contribution of your carbohydrate calories to the diet, add this to the contribution of your protein calories (remember both carbohydrates and fat supply four calories per gram) and then subtract this from your daily total calorie allotment. The final number you get there will determine how many calories should come from fat so divide by 9 in order to get total number of grams.

This will allow you to eat some carbohydrates on a daily basis so as to keep your body out of ketosis and supply more energy for your workouts. It is really up to you whether or not you want to eat the extra carbohydrates on days you don't workout, some people will choose to keep some carbohydrates in on those days but decrease them slightly while others might choose to completely remove them.

Furthermore, if you are only doing a moderate intensity paced cardio sessions, it isn't likely that you need the carbohydrates in your diet either so you can remove them from those days if you wish as well.

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Refeed Period:

On the refeed side of things, in a CKD the main purpose of the refeed period is as already stated, to restore muscle glycogen levels. When individuals on a CKD do their refeeds, they are also by default eating many more calories on these days as well.

On a diet that does bring calories quite low, it is a good idea to do some type of refeed period of higher calorie eating in an effort to make sure your metabolism does not slow down too much and to give your body a break from the rigors of dieting.

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Therefore, even on a TKD, if you are still dieting pretty hard (meaning with the additional carbs you are still quite low calorie), adding in a couple of days of higher calorie eating is a good plan. You can add a great deal more carbohydrates if you wish, or take a more balanced approach adding a combination of more protein and fat in.

Since you are eating carbohydrates during the week you may not be quite as glycogen depleted as someone on a CKD therefore wouldn't need to 'carb load' in a sense as they do on a CKD. Definitely though, it would be a good idea to make sure a fair amount of this refeed does come from carbohydrates as if you are exercising heavy you are still likely to be low on glycogen levels.

Keto Diets:

Conclusion

So if you want to maintain a more rigorous exercise program, consider giving a TKD a try. It works along some similar principles as a CKD, but also has some important alterations.

This diet would also be ideal for those who are looking to gain mass but want to maintain their blood sugar levels as the carbohydrates are placed into the diet at times when it is most likely that they will not get turned into body fat. The additional carbohydrates also make this diet a little more anabolic due to increased insulin levels which is another important thing you want whenever you are trying to gain muscle mass.

To rate this diet as far as fat loss is concerned, I would give it 3.5/5 and in terms of building lean muscle mass, 4/5.

Part 1 | Part 2


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About The Author

I’ve been working in the field of exercise science for the last 8 years. I’ve written a number of online and print articles.

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brokaza

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brokaza

I'm interested in TKD however, I cant figure out the formula. Protein 240 grams, Carbs 79 grams, and now I'm lost. I don't know what my fat should be nor my calories intake daily should be. Can some one help me?

Jan 24, 2013 3:40pm | report
 
breedog03

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breedog03

Check out setting up the diet under ckd, the formula applies with Tkd. Protein calories are 4 x your body weight. Fat is 14-16 calories per pound of body weight. Subtract your protein calories from your fat calories and the # left you divide by 9 to get your fat per day in grams.

Apr 3, 2013 4:03pm | report
20fourseven

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20fourseven

A person will never get into ketosis with that many carbs- the calculator is messed up, I keep my carbs under 20 grams(161 lbs with ~12 BF) and it takes me 2-3 days to get into ketosis after carbs load day. My sugar carbs comes from whey protein concentrate, rest of the carbs comes from non-starchy vegetables.

Aug 26, 2013 1:08pm | report
BigManChris

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BigManChris

im starting a keto diet at the moment. Im using it in a cutting program at the moment. Im planning on having 1680 calories with 34g carbs 190g protein 79g fat. Are these good ratios?

Feb 26, 2013 11:55pm | report
 
20fourseven

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20fourseven

I would say drop those carbs even more ~20grams and increase healthy fats to ~85grams and protein to ~195 grams- Take those (sugar)carbs right after a workout and that all-have non-starchy vegetables with lean cut meat and fish to achieve that goal. Good Luck

Aug 26, 2013 1:12pm | report
BigManChris

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BigManChris


and when im overloading on carbs for the short period of time do i really need that much. could i have 300 grams spread between 48 hours?

Feb 27, 2013 12:00am | report
 
breedog03

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breedog03

The part 1 says not to worry about carbs get your calorie intake from fat and protein.

Apr 3, 2013 4:05pm | report
 
artbum

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artbum

I think there's an error. In the carb intake paragraph, it reads: "Generally an intake of 0.33 grams of carbs per pound of body weight is recommended (so 40-80 grams for most people) for each meal"

It's PER DAY, not per meal, right? 40-80g is for the whole day.

May 11, 2013 11:08am | report
 
nodiesop

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nodiesop

yeah... this has to be changed pronto. People consuming 120-240g of carbs a day thinking they are in keto...

May 21, 2013 2:38pm | report
stevez23

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stevez23

I weigh 168 and my calculated carbs were 55g. Does this mean 55g before and 55g after workout or do I spread this 55g out for before and after as in 22.5 before workout and 22.5 after?

Jun 5, 2013 8:45pm | report
 
MolonLabe2A

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MolonLabe2A

Does the TKD protocol allow for a carb refeed one day a week? The following is what I plan on doing:

Eat high fat, high protein low carb Mon-Sat

Sunday Carb refeed while trying to keep fat at a minimum, protein high and calories high as well to reset leptin levels.

Train fasted supplemented with BCAA's Mon-Fri with PWO shakes using Whey Protein, Vitargo/Waxy Maize and Creatine. Wake up at 5 am fast all day, lift at 4 pm followed immediately with PWO shake (around 5 pm), then an hour later start eating my food for the day until bedtime.

I've done the standard CKD before, but only one refeed a week didn't keep my muscle glycogen full enough to make it through the week. I only lift about an hour each session and it's mostly compound and "old timey" lifts (lots of overhead pressing). I've also did TKD with no refeeds, but I felt without the heavy carb day once a week left my hormone levels lacking ie. Leptin, Testosterone and overall mood.

Has anyone attempted the TKD with a refeed day? Any advice or constructive criticism? Sorry for such a long post.

Aug 10, 2013 11:24pm | report
 
patchrik

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patchrik

I've done CKD a few times before but I cycle maybe six to ten weeks not weekly. If you cycle weekly you will fail due to many reasons one of them being cravings. You cannot realize true fat loss binging or carb loading every week. There are exception but few and only for very disciplined people. Now TKD I've done also and am doing now kinda. You're not doing any type of keto if you are doing more than 70 g of carbs in any given day (and that is a maximum rarely seen). You should be shooting for 20 grams per day and maybe putting 10 grams pre-workout and 10 post workout or any combination but do make sure you keep it right adjacent to the workout and keep to a minimum.

Jan 9, 2014 6:44am | report
BenjaminT

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BenjaminT

I did this diet last year, works great for fat loss, but muscle loss can't be avoided.

Jul 15, 2014 6:31am | report
 
Williamvagedes

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Williamvagedes

I used something similar. As long as I kept carbs below 30 everday, add 30 in the form of vegetable juice from my juiceman extra before workout 3 days a week,kept my protein at 100 grams and 2200 calories, I stayed in deep ketosis as checked with ketostix.I wasn't hungry and I lost about 3 pounds of body fat but I was wooped about half way though my workout and gained almost no muscle mass. I've added whey protein beforehand after my workout and and on cardio days to bring my protien up to 160 grams, added creatine. I feel a lot better, I think I'm losing fat but the ketostix are no longer purple just mild ketones. We'll see hope it works. I check my body fat in about 10 days.

Nov 7, 2014 4:33pm | report
 
Showing 1 - 14 of 14 Comments

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