Bare Minimum Training: Progressive Resistance Training System - (Part 5)

The objective of Progressive Resistance Training or weight training is to build lean muscle on our bodies. Building lean muscle will boost metabolism and that is what we want to achieve.


Bare Minimum Training
Chapter 5: The BMT Progressive Resistance Training System

Table Of Contents:

    Main: Foreword & Acknowledgements

  1. Introduction
  2. A Reason to Change
  3. "Proper" Nutrition
  4. Special Note to Women
  5. The BMT Progressive Resistance Training System
  6. The BMT Moderate Aerobic Exercise Regimen
  7. Consistency
  8. The Bare Minimum Training In-house Workout
  9. The Bare Minimum Training Shed Workout

"Some Of The Infomercials On Exercise Equipment Talk About Short Workouts ... They Are Actually Onto Something."


-> Why Is Weight Training Important?

    The objective of Progressive Resistance Training or weight training is to build lean muscle on our bodies. Building lean muscle will boost metabolism and that is what we want to achieve.

    In fact, you'll even start burning more calories even while you rest. I'll let you in on a little known secret:

    You need lean muscle because that is where fat is burned!

    And, the more lean muscle you have, the more fat you will burn. That is what we are trying to accomplish with weight training. In order to build lean muscle, we must get stronger every workout. Let me repeat ... in order to build lean muscle (and lean sexy muscle for you women), we must get stronger every workout. That is what we call progressive - striving to get just a little stronger each time.

Belfert
+ Click To Enlarge.
Striving To Get Just A Little Stronger Each Time.


-> Where Bare Minimum Training Comes In:

    Weight train only twice per week with each session lasting about 20-to-30 minutes, or less! Most people think they must go to the gym and weight train five to six nights a week for 2-to-3 hours a night to get fit. This, in my view, is a misconception and is totally wrong thinking and is certainly not Bare Minimum.

    In fact if you weight train on this type of a schedule you are putting yourself at a great risk of injury. The way I teach my clients to get fit is by going to the gym to weight train only twice per week with each session lasting about 20-to-30 minutes. This is generally followed by about 18-to-30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise (more on cardio in the next chapter). I know this works - my clients are proof of the Bare Minimum Training system!

    You see, you are not actually trying to grow your muscles while you are in the gym. The objective is to give your muscles the right amount of "stimulus" to grow. This is accomplished within the first half hour of weight training. After that, if you don't have time to do cardio that night, your total session is over and you are free to do other things. After you leave the gym, your muscles grow and repair themselves while you're at rest or sleeping.

    I don't know about you, but when I look around at the various gyms out there, I see over 95% of people spending way over 30 minutes on their weight training. Some even spend more than one or two hours on just weight training. That is because they fall into the trap that "more is better." That is definitely not true. You will do much more harm than good to your body if you over-train.

    The result of overtraining is you break down your body, get sick a lot, feel tired most of the time and in general not feel like doing much of anything. Of course, if you under train you will not accomplish your goals. You have to find the right balance. Keep reading and I will tell you what the right balance is: Bare Minimum.

    Most people think they must do the standard 3 sets of 10-15 repetitions on a multitude of exercises. Before you know it, over 2 hours went by. Why do the vast majority of people do this? Because they don't know any better plus most gyms like the floor full of people so it looks busy so more people join! Bottom line, gyms want to sell memberships and they are not going to tell you to come only twice per week for about 30 minutes. Come to think of it, once you paid for your membership they don't care if you show up at all! It's really all up to you!

    Let's talk about multiple sets. You don't need them! That's right, they are a waste of your time! I'll give you an analogy. When you want to turn on the lights, what do you do? You go over to the light switch and turn the light switch on - once. You do not stand there and turn the switch on and off, on and off, on and off, over and over again do you? No, you don't. Why not? Because the light switch will eventually wear out and break. Well that is what you're doing with your body in the gym spending hours doing multiple sets. You are wearing out your body and getting poor results.

    What you do need to do is keep track of your workouts and strive to get stronger each and every workout. Even if it is only one repetition stronger. Let's say on a Monday you bench-pressed 100 pounds for 8 repetitions. Well your goal for the next Monday is to bench-press that same 100 pounds for at least one more repetition. So you would lookup in your log book that the previous Monday you bench pressed 100 pounds for 8 reps, so one more rep would be 9 so your goal would be to get at least 9 reps for that exercise. However, don't stop at 9 reps for that exercise; if you can do more, get 10 or 11 or 12! Stop when you can't lift the weight anymore. (You will need someone to spot you.)

    If you got more than 10 reps, it's time to increase the weight the next Monday. Increase the weight to at least 105 pounds on the bench press. If again you get more than 10 reps, you would then increase the weight the following Monday to at least 110 pounds or even 115 pounds or 120 pounds. You want to get between 6-10 reps each time. If you increased the weight and only got 4 reps, that's OK, you'll get 5 or 6 reps the next week. As long as you keep increasing your reps each week and you reach 10 or more reps in any exercise, you can increase the weight the next week.

    This is an example of Progressive Resistance Training. It means getting stronger over time, progressively. You must get stronger every work out. Lifting the same weights over and over again and talking to your friend is not doing anything to change your body.

    I'll give you another analogy. What if you had this block of wood with a nail sticking out and I told you that your main goal was to knock this nail through the wood. So you go over and get a hammer and start hammering the nail but the nail doesn't go through, so you keep on hammering over and over again, for an hour, two hours, 12 hours, one day, one week, one year, still hammering away but the nail is still sticking out of the wood.

    So I come along and tell you to go over there and pick up that sledgehammer over in the corner. You do so and then even though it's difficult you raise this sledgehammer and whack that pain in the neck nail through that wood in ONE SHOT! The goal is accomplished with one blow compared to years of whacking away with that plain old little hammer. Well my friend, when you lift lightweights or stay with the exact same weights over and over again you are using that little old hammer. You need to increase your power to that of the powerful sledgehammer.

What Is The Importance Of Post-Workout Nutrition?

    The example workouts I have included in this chapter, Workout A and Workout B, will illustrate what I have explained. But before you start please review my checklist:


-> BMT "Getting Started" Checklist:

  • Weigh yourself initially and then hide the scale.
  • Take some "before" pictures, then put them away.
  • Get medical clearance from a physician.
  • Hire a fitness professional for at least a month, if you have no experience.
  • Keep track of your workouts in a logbook.
  • Finally, I ask that you provide some feedback. I would sure like to know if the Bare Minimum Training program works for you as well as it has for many of my clients. So please:

    Let me know about your progress and successes via email. Send me your before and after pictures

    Email to billbelfert@yahoo.com

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-> Workout A - Chest, Back & Shoulders:


-> Workout B - Legs, Biceps, Triceps & Abs:

That's it! Bare Minimum Training! What? You don't think this is enough? Remember the "light switch" we just want to turn the lights on, we don't want to wear out the switch. With your body, you just want to give it enough stimuli to grow strong and lean. That stimulus is lifting a weight to positive failure. Once you reach this point, that's it, go onto the next exercise in the workout. If you don't and continue to do multiple sets, you will just break down your body and your muscles will not grow - in fact you might even get smaller!


-> Training Exercises By Body Part:


-> Example Training Regimen:

    Here is an example of what your workout logbook might look like over two weeks time. Always rest at least one day before you do the next workout. Choose two days, for example, a Monday and Thursday or Tuesday and Friday, or a Monday and a Wednesday. You are only performing workouts A & B each once per week. Anymore than that and you will break down your body. Here is a special note - never do the same workouts A & B back to back.


    First Week:

    • Monday: Resistance Workout A
    • Tuesday: Cardio - 18 minutes
    • Wednesday: Cardio - 18 minutes
    • Thursday: Resistance Workout B
    • Friday: Cardio - 18 minutes
    • Saturday: Rest
    • Sunday: Rest


    1st Week Resistance Workout A:

Exercise Set Type Weight lbs. Reps
Incline Bench Press Warm Up 100 10
Incline Bench Press Warm Up 110 10
Incline Bench Press Main Set 150 6-
Chest Press Machine Main Set 125 11^
Dead Lifts Warm Up 145 10
Dead Lifts Warm Up 185 10
Dead lifts Main Set 225 8-
Bent Over Barbell Rows Main Set 185 10^
Close Grip Lat Pulldowns Main Set 170 9-
Dumbbell Shoulder Press Warm Up 25 10
Dumbbell Shoulder Press Warm Up 30 10
Dumbbell Shoulder Press Main Set 35 7-
Dumbbell Side Lateral Raise Warm Up 20 10
Dumbbell Side Lateral Raise Main Set 25 10^


    1st Week Resistance Workout B

Exercise Set Type Weight lbs. Reps
Squats Warm Up 135 10
Squats Warm Up 225 10
Squats Main Set 285 9-
Leg Extensions Main Set 120 8-
Leg Curls Main Set 125 11^
Standing Calf Raise Warm Up 100 10
Standing Calf Raise Main Set 155 10^
Standing Barbell Curl Warm Up 85 10
Standing Barbell Curl Warm Up 95 10
Standing Barbell Curl Main Set 100 8-
Cable Pushdowns Warm Up 30 10
Cable Pushdown Warm Up 40 10
Cable Pushdown Main Set 45 9-
**Dips Main Set Body weight 4
Leg Raises Main Set Body weight To failure
Cable Crunches Warm Up 60 10
Cable Crunches Main Set 100 4-


    Second Week:

    • Monday: Resistance Workout A
    • Tuesday: Cardio - 18 minutes
    • Wednesday: Cardio - 18 minutes
    • Thursday: Resistance Workout B
    • Friday: Cardio - 18 minutes
    • Saturday: Rest
    • Sunday: Rest


    2nd Week Resistance Workout A:

Exercise Set Type Weight lbs. Reps
Incline Bench Press Warm Up 100 10
Incline Bench Press Warm Up 110 10
Incline Bench Press Main Set 150 8-
Chest Press Machine Main Set 130 8-
Dead Lifts Warm Up 145 10
Dead Lifts Warm Up 185 10
Dead lifts Main Set 225 9-
Bent Over Barbell Rows Main Set 190 7-
Close Grip Lat Pull Downs Main Set 170 12^
Dumbbell Shoulder Press Warm Up 25 10
Dumbbell Shoulder Press Warm Up 30 10
Dumbbell Shoulder Press Main Set 35 10^
Dumbbell Side Lateral Raise Warm Up 20 10
Dumbbell Side Lateral Raise Main Set 30 7-


    2nd Week Resistance Workout B:

Exercise Set Type Weight lbs. Reps
Squats Warm Up 135 10
Squats Warm Up 225 10
Squats Main Set 285 13^
Leg Extensions Main Set 120 10^
Leg Curls Main Set 130 8-
Standing Calf Raise Warm Up 100 10
Standing Calf Raise Main Set 160 9-
Standing barbell Curl Warm Up 85 10
Standing Barbell Curl Warm Up 95 10
Standing barbell Curl Main Set 100 10^
Cable Pushdowns Warm Up 30 10
Cable Pushdown Warm Up 40 10
Cable Pushdown Main Set 45 12^
**Dips Main Set Body weight 6
Leg Raises Main Set Body weight To failure
Cable Crunches Warm Up 60 10
Cable Crunches Main Set 100 7-


Leg Extension.

      As shown in this example training schedule, you will have to use weights that are good for you - a weight which you can do between 6-10 reps. You can see that once you reach 10 or more reps on a main set, it is time to increase the weight on that exercise the next week. After 4 weeks or so, if you get bored with a particular exercise, or hit a plateau (you can't reach 10 or more reps) you can change the exercise.

      As an example you can change incline barbell bench press to flat dumbbell bench press and do that new exercise for a few weeks until you again feel the need to change the routine. This is common, but fortunately, there are many different exercises to choose from to keep things fresh. That's it. The "magic" is getting progressively stronger on a consistent basis over time as well as training just enough - The Bare Minimum - to stimulate your body in the creation of lean muscle and burning fat.

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Copyright © Bill Belfert, Managing Member Bare Minimum Training LLC. All rights reserved. No liability is assumed by Bare Minimum Training LLC., Nor the author for any information contained herein. This text does not provide medical advice. Specific medical advice should be obtained from a doctor. Bare Minimum Training LLC. advises all to consult a physician and gain medical clearance before you begin any new nutrition, exercise, or dietary supplement program. Results are not typical. Any application of the techniques, ideas and suggestions in this book is at the reader's sole discretion and risk.