The New Law Of Supply And Demand: Supply Your Body's Demands

The key moment in your workout comes when you set down the weights. Learn what and when to feed your muscles post-workout.

Three trillion dollars—that's how much the world spends on "wellness" each year. Business is booming; unfortunately, the results are often a bust. Which, strangely enough, is good for business. The thing that matters to many health marketers is that people try something, because people spend money trying things. If it doesn't work, people might pay more money to try something else, elsewhere.

I'm going to offer another economics concept, one that's free, and one that can actually help you achieve the shape you always wanted. I'm talking about the law of supply and demand, but not the one outlined by Adam Smith in Wealth of Nations. I'm talking about supply and demand as it pertains to the human body, which affects the health of nations.

This physical law of supply and demand will make or break your efforts at transformation. Timing is everything, and never more so than here. The hard work you undertake in the gym creates the "demand" for your muscles to grow. But, in order for that to happen, you must "supply" them with proper rest and nutrition. The timing needs to be precise, and it revolves around when your workout ends.

You don't change in the gym except in superficial ways. You may get tired,
but the energy will return.
You may get pumped,
but that will go away.
What you have done is
set the stage for change, but
it depends on what you do next. The demand is essential but insufficient by itself. Demand without a supply creates a failed system.

In contrast, a successful system brings together demand and a supply of materials, leading to growth and change, and it combines them at just the right moment.

Think of it in terms of building a stone wall. You have stone and mortar mix. Put up the stones without the mortar, and there's no cohesion or durability. In order for the mortar mix to become a strong binding element, it must react with water. In the gym, we simply take a powder form of mortar mix (i.e. our muscles), apply water (i.e. our workout routine), and stir (i.e. our intensity). At the end of a good workout, our muscles are nothing more than a weak, pasty form of mortar mix—too weak to hold a stone against gravity on a vertical wall. But given enough time, support and air, the mortar will fix the stones into a structure capable of lasting a lifetime.

Once you create the demand by going to the gym, you must then allow the supply of rest and nutrition to trigger your desired results. I stress the demand because without it, all the supplements and nutrition that enter our body is a waste of money.

Nutrition isn't about what we put in our mouth, but rather what our body digests and absorbs.

If we agree that it isn't what we eat, but rather what our body digests and accepts, then replenishing our body when our body most needs it will yield the greatest results.

Specifically, after any workout there's a 45-minute window during which our demand is at its highest. Miss this window, and you miss maximizing your workout benefits.

The nature of that supply is equally important.

Having food in your stomach within 45 minutes of your workout isn't good enough; it needs to be delivered to your muscles within 45 minutes.

How do you ensure that happens? Go liquid! Liquid nutrition is the fastest-absorbing fuel when demand is at its highest. Taking this a step farther, simple carbohydrates are better than complex carbohydrates at this point, and whey protein is better than casein protein.

So after a hard workout, grab your shaker bottle, which should already contain these elements in these elements: 25% of your body weight, converted to grams, of whey protein (200-pound person = 50 grams of whey protein). Put in 40% of your body weight, converted to grams, of simple sugar. I suggest dextrose, a simple sugar you can buy at the grocery store. Add another 5 grams of L-Glutamine, the fastest-absorbing amino acid), as well as 5 grams of creatine.

Post-Workout Shake Calculator

Enter Your Body Weight:
Mix With Water:

Simply add water, shake and deliver it to starving muscles to ensure your efforts in the gym are met with maximum nutrition when it's needed the most.

Getting in shape and sustaining that shape isn't guesswork; it's a mathematical system in which intensity and information are the main variables. The more you know how your body works, the more successful you'll be!

Met-Rx


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BenMier

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BenMier

I like how in the first picture, there is an ab separation line under your belly button, but in the last picture there's no hint of said line whatsoever. Its funny when they photoshop 10-packs onto guys even though there are only 8 abdominal muscles (if you count the lower abdominals).

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Aug 30, 2012 7:57pm | report
 
SugarNation

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SugarNation

Simpler explanation: Different shoots, done at different times, with different conditioning levels.

Aug 31, 2012 9:59am | report
Holly444

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Holly444

photoshopped or not, he's still one of the sexiest men alive.

Aug 31, 2012 12:23pm | report
robinson2434

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robinson2434

Your abs look different depending on the way you flex them lol

Aug 31, 2012 12:43pm | report
jwethall

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jwethall

Actually the 8/10 pack your referring to is only one muscle; the rectus abdominus m. The 8 pack is a result of the tendinous sheath that surrounds the muscle itself. That being said, there are anatomical anomalies that could contribute to the "10 pack," heck some people are born with multiple spleens why not an extra tendon separation. the cadavers I studied were divided into 6 sections plus the lower part of the sheath, but they weren't fitness models...

Aug 31, 2012 12:57pm | report
EugenF

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EugenF

Dude, this guy is Greg Plitt. He is NOT photoshopped, trust me.

Sep 1, 2012 3:45am | report
xTwK

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xTwK

Saying that the #1 fitness model in the world is photoshopped, now that's hilarious.

Sep 1, 2012 1:44pm | report
felro

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felro

Greg Plitt brah...

Sep 1, 2012 2:34pm | report
bunnybuilder

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bunnybuilder

different lighting also has a monumental affect. He's also in a totally different pose.

Sep 2, 2012 7:54pm | report
mrcadafi

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mrcadafi

L0L...! Dude...! He's different in the two pictures cause in the first one hes all pumped up and second one hes not..! Telling GREG PLITT is PHOTOSHOPPED is hilarious...! Belive me it IS...!

Sep 17, 2012 12:21am | report
geohhh

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geohhh

Very useful advice. And I like the Calculator!

Aug 31, 2012 11:11am | report
 
robc217

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robc217

Love the calculator, but if I weigh 173 lbs, I am really supposed to eat ~450 calories post workout? So for simple sugar I was told you can eat candy like gummy bears. Does anyone else eat candy for the simple sugar?

Aug 31, 2012 12:45pm | report
 
jwethall

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jwethall

I wouldn't, sucrose and fructose are more processed and can lead to more bodyfat retention/accumulation.

Aug 31, 2012 1:14pm | report
AlecC1031

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AlecC1031

I agree, but some candies, (wonka's pixi sticks and bottle caps for example) use exclusively dextrose if you feel the need for some postworkout candy. Very few candies are like this however, so be cautious and read the label CLOSELY.

Sep 1, 2012 7:08pm | report
wesleycneill

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wesleycneill

Could we get a few more references and citations on BB.com articles? I'd love to read some of the actual studies that lead to your conclusions. I don't doubt you are correct, I'm just a fiend for information straight from the source. Thanks!

Aug 31, 2012 5:02pm | report
 
jack5633

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jack5633

Thats because when you breathe, your abls contract so that probably why.

Aug 31, 2012 5:08pm | report
 
EricG2006

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EricG2006

My post workout shake consists of 36g of protein(1 1/2 scoops of Combat Powder), 5g of added Glutamine & 5g of added BCAA. Good? Does anyone recommend I add carbs/sugars like Dextrose as mentioned in the article?
Goal: Add size, lower bf to around 8%

Aug 31, 2012 5:21pm | report
 
desaitapas

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desaitapas

to those who dont believe the simple sugars part: many fitness experts recommend them (most notable on bb might be jim stopanni in his shortcut to size program). the basic gist of it is that after a workout, your body needs energy immediately. the protein shake you drink isnt going to go to work until 30 mins after to maybe even 2 hours. simple carbs like candy, gummy bears, white bread, etc provide instant nrg. just dont eat too many of them or ur body will actually store them as fat, just enough for some nrg.

Aug 31, 2012 7:50pm | report
 
desaitapas

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desaitapas

to add to my post, the science behind the sugars is that your glycogen/blood sugar levels are depleted during training as your body metabolizes the sugars for nrg. thus, you are mainly helping to equalize your glycogen levels when you eat a simple sugar. but like i said, dont take this as a chance to consume gummy bears like its a contest lol.

Aug 31, 2012 7:54pm | report
rainmanjng

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rainmanjng

This is only the case when you go to the gym in a pretty depleted state. Between your liver and skeletal muscle your body can hold 600 grams of glycogen, and so anyone in a consistant calorie surplus(bulking) will most likely have their glycogen stores close to filled. Furthermore you don't come close to using 600g of glycogen in one session short of a 3 hour high intensity workout. Marathon runners and those on serious carb restricting diets are the demographic who this concept was originally intended for.

Sep 1, 2012 9:02pm | report
bunnybuilder

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bunnybuilder

some major bro science going on here and in this article. Most people observe pre workout nutrition and many even drink BCAA's etc. intra workout. I highly doubt it matters what form or type of carbs enter your body after you workout.

Sep 2, 2012 7:57pm | report
TonedJordan

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TonedJordan

The "broscience" behind it is nothing to do with getting energy so I have no idea what makes you think that. The simple carbs are to cause an insulin spike which helps force nutrients into your muscle cells due to glycogen depletion. So it means you absorb more of the protein in a shorter amount of time (apparently). That is the theory behind it, not agreeing or disagreeing with it.

Sep 5, 2012 6:36am | report
chuck2334

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chuck2334

Could I do something like karbolyn or a carb powder instead of sugars?

Aug 31, 2012 8:11pm | report
 
desaitapas

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desaitapas

yes u can and many already do (kris gethin). =)

Sep 1, 2012 2:17pm | report
Gilgamesh13

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Gilgamesh13

My post workout shake is 10 eggs 1 L of whole fat milk 20 g of natural honey in shaker... Can't get better than that.

Sep 1, 2012 7:47am | report
 
Showing 1 - 25 of 51 Comments

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