Former All American Athlete Terence Haynes Shares His 225 Pound Weight Loss Story!

For former All American athlete Terence Haynes, food was a necessary part of his pre-competition preparation. It also became something that would almost cost him his life. Find out how he lost more than 200 pounds in just one year!

Article Summary:
  • Terence Haynes lost more than 200 pounds in just 1 year.
  • At age 45 Terence joined the Baldwin-Wallace College wrestling team.
  • Personal trainer Paul Scianna has been working with Terence.
  • For former All American athlete Terence Haynes, food was a necessary part of his pre-competition preparation. It also became something that would almost cost him his life. As a food addiction survivor, Terence must now carefully measure all he eats, paying special attention to the number of calories he consumes.

    For a man who once again hopes to become a high performance athlete, food is now a tool, but should a relapse occur it could also, again, become his worst enemy.

    Having lost a documented staggering 200-plus pounds of body fat in one year, Terence, at around 230 pounds, has an amazing story to share. Formerly known for his prowess on the sports field, Terence, upon leaving athletics, became a champion at pounding down the food. His weight rocketed to more than 450 pounds.

    Spending all of his money on food while concealing his bizarre nutritional habits - at one time he was eating over 15,000 calories per day (the average man would eat around 2,000)-from his family, Terence continued eating himself into an early grave.

    Terence Continued Eating Himself Into An Early Grave.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    Terence continued eating
    himself into an early grave.

    Despite the problems associated with being clinically obese-the simple act of walking, for example-Terence was oblivious to his condition. In his mind he was still an elite athlete and nobody could tell him differently.

    But one day it had all become too much. Terence came to the realization he needed to do something, and fast. Fortunately he eventually came into contact with health and fitness expert and renowned personal trainer, Paul Scianna.

    After an early meeting in which Paul told him he would need to lose a substantial amount of weight, or die, Terence got to work and applied his athletic work ethic and mindset to losing the equivalent of one large person in weight.

    After losing more than 200 pounds, Terence, at age 45, joined the Baldwin-Wallace College wrestling team and is now looking to achieve further fat loss while boosting his athletic credentials.

    Terence's Trainer, Paul Scianna.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    Terence's Trainer, Paul Scianna.

    While once he would think nothing of eating a plate of fried chicken and a couple of burgers for breakfast, he now consumes a balanced diet lean on fatty meats and high in vegetables and quality proteins.

    In achieving one of the most impressive body transformations ever recorded, Terence is now sought after for advice on how to beat food addiction while losing weight.

    His example is an inspiration to all and his story is nothing short of remarkable. In this Bodybuilding.com exclusive, Terence explains how he beat the odds to become a new man.

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    [ Q ] I understand you battled an eating addiction for a number of years? Exactly how long did you have this addiction?
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      The key to this is that I didn't realize I had a problem. So as I look back and begin to understand things, I realize I have had a problem for most of my life.

      Since I was a little child, I can remember at 6-or-7-years old coming back to the dinner table and cleaning it up and eating the leftovers when everyone had left. I didn't actually know I had a problem. Even in my early teen years-at maybe 12- or 13-years old-I was gaining weight but I was always active.

      I never knew I had a problem and you couldn't really tell me I had a problem, even though I weighed in-at one point-at 429 pounds a little more than a year ago. But to me I was 200 pounds. I didn't see myself as being more than 400 pounds.

    RELATED VIDEO: TERENCE HAYNES INTERVIEW


    Terence Haynes Interview:

    Check out this interview with Baldwin Wallace College wrestler Terence Haynes.

      I may have jumped even higher than the 429 (pounds), but I didn't ever really want to get on the scale. So I am just now recognizing that I have a problem (laughs). So to answer your question I have had an eating problem most of my life.

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    [ Q ] So it took a realization on your part that you had a problem before you did something about it.
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      That is correct.

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    [ Q ] How much weight did you in fact lose and what do you weigh right now?
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      I weighed in with Paul at 429 pounds, but I was probably about 460-470 (pounds), but that's not documented. I lost a little more than 200 pounds in one year. Now I'm under 230, so I lost 225 pounds.

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    [ Q ] So the weight that you are carrying right now is a good realistic number for you?
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      Yes, but I want to get down even more because we are still working out. And I needed to actually lose weight to get in shape anyway.

    I Needed To Actually Lose Weight To Get In Shape Anyway.
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    I Needed To Actually Lose
    Weight To Get In Shape Anyway.

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    [ Q ] Underneath your starting weight of more than 429 pounds (documented) you conceivably had the body of an athlete since you were, I understand, a former All American.
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      Yes, exactly.

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    [ Q ] You say you want to lose even more weight. Is this to improve your athletic abilities or because of health reasons, or both?
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      I want to lose some more weight to improve as an athlete and to improve health-wise as well. Because I don't see myself going into professional athletics, but it is a possibility. You never know.

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    [ Q ] You mentioned once that although you stopped competing as an athlete you did not stop eating like one and continued consuming many calories after you had stepped away from sports.

    Can you clarify whether the food you were eating after stopping athletics was the so-called healthy foods or was it what could be considered bad?
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      I always ate fried foods: fried chicken, potato chips with lots of soda pop. I would drink liters of soda per day-2-to-4, sometimes six liters of soda pop in a given day.

      Fettuccini alfredo, beef steaks. Over a day it might not be all that bad, but when I'm consuming it all at one meal it becomes a problem.

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    [ Q ] And you didn't do any kind of exercise to work any of this off.
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      No. Not at all.

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    [ Q ] At more than 429 pounds obviously there are health concerns, but did you experience any documented health problems directly attributable to your size?
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      No, the only thing that was documented was gout. But I didn't want to go to the doctor, so even when I did go they told me I would need to do screening for diabetes and high cholesterol and all that.

    Gout:
    Gout is a disease hallmarked by elevated levels of uric acid in the bloodstream. In this condition, crystals of monosodium urate (MSU) or uric acid are deposited on the articular cartilage of joints, tendons and surrounding tissues.

    It is marked by transient painful attacks of acute arthritis initiated by crystallization of urates within and about the joints and eventually leads to chronic gouty arthritis and the deposition of masses of urates in joints and other sites, creating tophi. Gout results from a combination of prolonged elevation of uric acid and overall acidity in the bloodstream.

      But I never did because I didn't want to face the truth that was my reality. I would shun the doctors; I would shun getting on the scale and anything like that. But, to me, I'm perfectly fine, because to me I'm still at high school and I'm the great athlete and no one can tell me differently.

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    [ Q ] So the crux of the problem seems to be the fact you were deluding yourself into thinking you were walking around at a normal weight when, in fact, you were clinically obese.
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      Exactly.

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    [ Q ] It must have been a major struggle for you to get around and do your daily tasks at 429 pounds, even if you didn't feel you had a problem at the time.
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      Well I adapted and adjusted and I never knew how hard it was until one day when training with Paul-I had lost about 100 pounds within a 5-month period. What he did was have me carry two 35-pound weight plates on both arms and we walked around a track.

      That was extremely difficult for me; I didn't realize how heavy I was until that day. And that was only 70 pounds I had to carry around the track a couple of times. I was huffing and puffing and it was like "there is no way I had all this weight on me." That's when I began to realize how heavy I really was.

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    [ Q ] And the impact it had on your health.
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      Yes it was very bad. I would, like, walk downstairs one stair at a time sideways.

    I Would Walk Downstairs One Stair At A Time Sideways.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    I would walk downstairs one
    stair at a time sideways.

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    [ Q ] How did you find walking through doors? I imagine this was also an issue for you?
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      It definitely was. I would squeeze through; sometimes try to go sideways. It was difficult, but I adapted because to me everything was perfectly normal.

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    [ Q ] Since you had it all mapped out in all mind that you were fine bodyweight-wise, did you also feel no related pain in your body, no possible warning signs, as a result of this mindset?
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      Yes, that is very true.

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    [ Q ] I would like to discuss the training methods your trainer Paul Scianna used to affect such amazing progress.
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      Definitely. One thing that triggered me initially in the beginning was that Paul took me aside in his office and said, "You really need to do something about your weight because you will die." And I'm afraid to die (laughs). So I trusted him that he would help me and do the right thing so we began with cardio.

      An example of cardio would be only on machines like cross trainers because with 400-plus pounds it would actually be difficult to walk long distances, believe it all not. Then we had boxing classes and they usually lasted an hour or so; that was very rigorous, but I continued to come.

      And we would do some lighter weight training, specifically for my weight loss. In one of the first weeks I lost about 10 pounds and I thought that was just amazing as before (Terence began training to lose weight two years prior to working with Paul) it had taken me about two years to lose about 10 pounds, and then I gained 40 (pounds) at this time.

      We would do quite a bit of cardio. There were times when my athletics ability helped. I would never give up. I would do an hour-sometimes two hours-on cardio, which is not normal for the average person, but I knew there was a goal here and I wasn't going to stop. It was exiting.

    Terence Haynes' Weight Loss Timeline.
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    Terence Haynes' weight-loss timeline.

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    [ Q ] Physically you had an athletic foundation to begin with. Was this background in fitness in any way beneficial in your massive weight loss efforts?
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      Oh yeah, that was beneficial because I was such an athlete 20-plus years ago and I was All American and never wanted to give up. So I enjoyed working out, I enjoyed exercising, but I didn't actually know how to eat.

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    [ Q ] So the biggest task for Paul would have been to have you eat the right foods and to stay consistent in this area.
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      That is true. His workouts were tough and it wasn't like they were easy (laughs). But the thing I like about Paul is that he is client-specific so everyone did everything differently depending on their unique goals. So I didn't know how to eat and didn't know what to eat and I didn't know what I was eating.

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    [ Q ] As your program progressed beyond the first few months, did Paul begin to make it harder for you?
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      Yes he did, even though it seemed like I was doing less work. It was a shorter period of time so my recovery time could be much quicker than before. So I didn't do as much cardio but he did emphasize many other things like push-ups and sit-ups and things like that for the entire body to keep the body strong.

      This was because he wanted me to tighten up as well, because normally when people lose that type of weight, many of the people I know they needed surgery, whereas I didn't need any type of surgery or anything like that. Everything is all natural.

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    [ Q ] People will try all kinds of outrageous methods to lose weight, from surgery to dangerous drugs to the Atkins Diet. Your weight loss is directly related to eating well and training hard, right?
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      That's it. All natural with everything we did.

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    [ Q ] Did you feel you might not make it at any time during that one-year weight loss period?
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      Definitely, oh yeah. Many times I wanted to give up and there were times I tried to manipulate the system; you have to know that I didn't actually understand I had an addiction. I didn't know that. There were times when I began to eat certain things.

      But one thing I know is that the scale doesn't lie (laughs). So I fell off the wagon for short periods of time but then I got right back on because I can't give up, I couldn't continue to stay selfish.

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    [ Q ] On that note, how hard, or easy, is it for you to now maintain your bodyweight of just less than 230 pounds?
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      Well it is a daily chore and a daily task, but I know that it is so beneficial because I want to play with my children. So it's very exciting.

      For me to not maintain that would be detrimental, both for me, and the people I come in contact with because I want to share this with so many other people: that they can do it also. If I can inspire and encourage or help in any type of way, that's why I'm here.

    If I Can Inspire And Encourage Or Help In Any Type Of Way, That's Why I'm Here.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    If I can inspire and encourage or help
    in any type of way, that's why I'm here.

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    [ Q ] So it would be fair to say that this weight loss and maintaining what you have achieved has become a lifestyle for you?
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      Definitely.

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    [ Q ] And your family are supportive of your weight loss goals?
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      Oh extremely, they are very happy and very excited. I have a cliché I was use and it is Carpe Diem (Seize the Day).

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    [ Q ] In terms of addiction it is said, for example, that once you are an alcoholic you always will be an alcoholic. Is this the same with a food addiction? Is this the case with you?
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      Well I wouldn't say it is necessarily the case with me, but what I do work on is relapse prevention. I won't put myself in that position. The key is to not put yourself in that position so it (relapse) would continuously be the case. To thine own self be true.

      So I have to be truthful to myself, that maybe I am not able to handle certain things. Like, for example, driving down a particular street with a restaurant I know I would have easy access to, so it's okay to go in a different direction. Right now it's whatever it takes.

      Even though I have lost the weight, I am still dealing with it. And that's a real thing and that's okay, but now I'm more truthful and honest with myself. That's the reality.

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    [ Q ] Would it be fair to say that your weight loss experience has made you an even more productive person as all you have to do to keep your mind off eating helps you to achieve more in life?
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      Definitely.

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    [ Q ] You also made an amazing transition from overweight food addict to athlete. What sports are you currently involved in?
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      Well currently I'm on the track team: I'm doing the shot put. And I wrestle during the fall.

    I Wrestle During The Fall.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    I wrestle during the fall.

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    [ Q ] Do you have any events coming up or are you just training in general right now?
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      No I don't have any events coming up because I've only recently just gone on the team. There are certain events that you have to qualify for. And I haven't qualified just yet for some of these bigger events.

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    [ Q ] You mentioned training 4-to-6 days per week. What kind of training schedule did your trainer Paul have you on?
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      Well there were some days that I would box. Basically like a boxing class. That might be in the morning. In the afternoon I might do some weight training and in the evening I may box again. It was goal oriented for me for weight loss.

      It's fabulous because the reality is it all worked, what he had me on, and doing. It was all regular foods, no diet foods or diet anything. We worked and weighed in and the weight was coming off every day.

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    [ Q ] Being a former food addict, staying on your eating schedule must have been very difficult. Did you ever feel like cheating on your diet as you worked through the weight loss process?
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      Oh yeah, definitely. And there were times when I did cheat on my diet (laughs). What Paul told me was that it was okay to cheat, but you have to make up for it the following day.

      That is the key. You don't have as many calories as you had the day before because you want to compensate for it (the excess calories the day before).

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    [ Q ] You mentioned earlier the fact you had gout when you were over 400 pounds. Obviously a high protein diet is not the best thing when one has gout. How did you navigate this issue when high protein is so crucial for building a leaner physique?
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      When I started training with Paul he shared with me right from the beginning-and this is going to sound funny because honesty I did not believe him-that when I start training with him I would never again have a bout of gout. It has now been quite some time and I haven't had a bout of gout in a couple of years now.

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    [ Q ] You are able to eat high protein and still did not get gout? If so, that's pretty amazing.
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      Well the meals were balanced. There was protein but it was nothing like it was before. The protein that I was eating-I'll give you example: I now average about six ounces of protein per meal, but the protein I was eating at the time was equivalent to maybe three pounds per meal.

    OUNCES TO POUNDS CONVERTER
    Weight: Pounds To Ounces
    Ounces To Pounds
    Results:

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    [ Q ] That is a pretty big plate full of fried chicken.
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      Exactly, and that is per meal, not for the day. That is per meal. So my protein intake today doesn't even compare. There is no comparison.

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    [ Q ] Your diet pre sub-400 pounds bodyweight was not exactly well balanced to state the obvious.
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      Exactly (laughs).

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    [ Q ] What would an average meal include for you now?
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      Well an example would be around 6-to-8 ounces of some form of protein, a couple of cups of vegetables and for my carbohydrate I might have a sweet potato. And then I would also have fruit.

      So for each meal I would eat probably 500-600 calories minimum. It's all balanced though: I have protein, carbohydrates and vegetables. What I wasn't doing before, I wasn't eating this many vegetables. I hardly had any. I was just mainly eating meat.

    So For Each Meal I Would Eat Probably 500-600 Calories Minimum.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    For each meal I would eat
    probably 500-600 calories minimum.

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    [ Q ] You were on the meat diet.
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      Yes, exactly (laughs).

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    [ Q ] Since you are quite a big guy at over 220 pounds, surely you would eventually require more calories than you are currently eating. Maybe this would help you to burn even more calories.
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      We will eventually increase the calories, but I'm on a pretty balanced program now, because I am on around 1,800-to-2,000 calories per day. Compared to the 15,000 calories I would consume.

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    [ Q ] Is that number even possible?
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      Well that is what I was doing every day.

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    [ Q ] I thought bodybuilders ate a lot. Speaking of bodybuilding would you ever compete?
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      This is kind of ironic that we are talking because for years I've always thought about bodybuilding and I thought, man I would love to do that and I would read the magazines. I always thought that would be great, you know.

    I Would Love To Compete.
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    I Would Love To Compete.

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    [ Q ] Well how about you begin training for bodybuilding at some point? Is this possible?
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      It is extremely possible.

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    [ Q ] If you ever do chose to do just that please contact Bodybuilding.com and we'll run a feature on your progress.
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      Okay, will do.

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    [ Q ] Thank you for the interview Terence and all the very best with your future training efforts, and your possible transition into bodybuilding.
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      Thank you David.

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    Interview With Terence's Trainer, Paul Scianna
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    The recent body transformation success of Terence Haynes was nothing short of incredible. Having lost more than 200 pounds in the short space of one year through training and eating well, Terence, a former food addict, showed that significant weight loss could be achieved the natural way. But he had a great deal of help in the process.

    Terence's trainer Paul Scianna, a pro athlete with an ability to get astounding results for his clients, knew that had Terence continued eating the way he was the outcome would likely be an early death. With Paul's intervention and continued support Terence defied the odds to where he now weighs a comparatively modest 230 pounds.

    How did Paul Scianna affect such amazing progress? In the following interview he details his relationship with Terence and explains how he helped him to achieve one of the most impressive body transformations of all time.

    How Did Paul Scianna Affect Such Amazing Progress?
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    How Did Paul Scianna
    Affect Such Amazing Progress?

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    [ Q ] You are credited as being the trainer who helped Terence Haynes achieve his amazing body transformation. What basic strategy did you employ to ensure his success?
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      I just stopped him eating everything. I began training him in December of '07. And it took him about a year to get 200 pounds off him. We he first came to see me he was 429 pounds and I did everything all natural, no supplements except for a multivitamin. It was just exercise and healthy eating.

      I'm not a registered dietician, but I do have a pretty solid background in nutrition. On top of that I've taken my own body through a number of transformations from football to wrestling to boxing, so I have figured out over the years how to gain and lose weight so that you are healthy and strong, and I applied that to him; just having Terence eat well balanced meals instead of him eating steaks and fettuccini for breakfast along with a couple of cheeseburgers.

      It was oatmeal to get more fiber. Just balance. Just a healthy lifestyle: it was not a diet really: just a lifestyle adjustment.

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    [ Q ] As we know, it is one thing to prescribe a training program but quite another to have one's client follow through to complete it. How difficult was it for you to have Terence focus on the task of losing weight?
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      It was extremely challenging I would say. To ask for help is not enough: you have to apply it. In Terence's case he just thought he would have to show up at times. We went through cycles of him doing really well for a week or two and then kind of falling off.

      But then in the end he was still losing weight, but it was just a lot of effort on my part. I would call him every morning to make sure he was getting up and eating his breakfast and getting to the gym on our off days. Because when we first got together we were exercising four to six times per week.

      He really needed to believe in himself is what it came down to. He needed to have the future in his mind and then break it down. And I helped him to break it down into smaller baby steps, because he had a big goal in the beginning.

    He Needed To Have The Future In His Mind And Then Break It Down.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    He needed to have the future in
    his mind and then break it down.

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    [ Q ] How long did it take before you could see any progress?
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      After we started exercising together the weight really started flying off at first. And he thought he would just get himself into shape and anything would have been in shape compared to where he was. Terence never knew he was that big and that was part of the issue.

      What was troubling for me was that he would look in the mirror and see an out of shape ex-athlete and not an enormous obese man in front of him. So that was a harder angle to get through to him that he really needed to make a whole lifestyle adjustment not just lose a few pounds.

      So after a couple of weeks of working out with me, he decided if he was going to lose some weight, he needed to lose it all. He first asked me if he thought it was possible and I said, "absolutely so" so long as he was committed and believed in himself and believed in me and trusted me. And I told him I would be there until the end.

      Truthfully I would see him at the gym (before becoming his trainer) and it was hard to watch because the guy was trying so hard but he wasn't losing weight. So that was when I approached him and how I got him was-we had become friends along the way-and I told him if he didn't do something about his weight he was going to die.

      And that struck a cord, because I didn't say it with any malice or intent. It was from the heart. That's when it all started.

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    [ Q ] You have a boxing background as a professional and are known for incorporating boxing style training into the workouts you prescribe for your clients. Was this the case for Terence?
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      Yes, a big part of that was the cardio element of boxing and more fat burning type training.

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    [ Q ] You would work in short burst anaerobic training with the longer cardiovascular exercises?
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      Yes, we mixed in a lot of weight training but we probably only maxed out three times over the course of a year as far as doing any heavy weight training.

      We did a higher volume of reps mixed in with boxing training. The boxing element of it is what really allowed him to lose the four pounds per week.

    The Boxing Element Of It Is What Really Allowed Him To Lose The Four Pounds A Week.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    The boxing element of it is what really
    allowed him to lose the four pounds per week.

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    [ Q ] The weight Terence lost over the timeframe you were working with him must be some kind of record. Is it right up there, as far as your success with your clients goes?
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      Yes definitely, he is my flagship right now. Definitely. He is an extreme case for sure.

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    [ Q ] So the average person aiming to lose weight might not achieve the kinds of result Terence did?
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      I believe his drive definitely helped him. He was more exercise-based. He would rather workout than eat properly, rather than put the two together. So the working out was not a problem for him and that's what a lot of people struggle with, the actual exercise component.

      I had him exercise the first time I took him through an evaluation and he did 38 push-ups at a weight of 439 pounds. And that is all the way down to the floor. He didn't have to go that far because he was so big. And he did them with no breaks and on his toes, not on his knees. I had him bench 495 pounds one day just to test him and to let him feel good about himself.

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    [ Q ] That is an incredible feat.
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      He is definitely a phenomenon as far as his athleticism is concerned because even though he was that big I had him stretching and he could kick his legs over his head.

    He Is Definitely A Phenomenon As Far As His Athleticism Is Concerned.
    Enlarge Click Image To Enlarge.
    He is definitely a phenomenon as
    far as his athleticism is concerned.

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    [ Q ] As his trainer, how do you feel Terence will do as far as maintaining what he has achieved?
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      That's the thing. My job is not done with him yet. This is the beginning of his new life. It takes about six months to develop good habits and he has to keep the weight off for six months before it can become a permanent fixture for him. And he struggles with kind of falling off a little bit, but we have got him back on track.

      It is tiring to put in all of that exercise and eating appropriately for him all this time, when he has been eating badly for the past 20 something years.

      As far as his school schedule and the fact he works full time and he wrestles and now he is throwing shot put for track he has got so much on his plate that it is really hard to do and that's where you can have difficulties. Just achieving the stepping-stones and maintaining, I guess, his sobriety of weight loss.

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    [ Q ] Having these sports is an incentive for him to continue maintaining his weight loss?
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      Absolutely and giving him new goals to go after keeps him a little distracted on the actual weight loss of it. He is not having the same thing every day but it does get a little tiring. We have more than a dozen different meal plans.

      I can't call them diets. They are different strategies, different types of eating. We have to switch up the format every now and then so he doesn't get bored or tired with the way he's eating.

    Paul Scianna
    CFT
    paul@empoweringpunch.com