The Rotator Cuff - Surgery?

Have you ever heard of someone having rotator cuff surgery? Maybe it was your favorite baseball pitcher, which most of them have problems with, or someone you know.

Have you ever heard of someone having rotator cuff surgery? Maybe it was your favorite baseball pitcher, which most of them have problems with, or someone you know. Well, the reason they have to have the surgery is because they don't work out the right muscles in the shoulder.

Have you ever tried to do the rear delt laterals laying on an incline bench? Pretty hard at first, huh? Well, I have learned of an exercise that targets the infraspinatus, the weakest muscle in your rotator cuff. I came across this after I talked to a baseball fitness trainer, who gave me advice as to strengthening my pitching arm. He told me what to do and I felt the results!

RELATED ARTICLE

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Rotator Cuff Injury!
Rotator cuff injuries are probably one of the most frequent injuries experienced by athletes and non-athletes... Shoulder hurt?
Author:
Shannon Clark

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Rotator Cuff Anatomy
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The Infraspinatus is in your back shoulder area, under the rear delt, next to the Teres Minor/Major muscles, and above the Rhomboidus Major. It is the very weakest muscle of the rotator cuff, and is hardly ever worked on, and that is the reason most baseball players need to have surgery.

There is no name for this exercise from what I know, but you will definitely have to start with low-weighted dumbbells. Try to bear with me in explaining this. Read carefully, and I am sure you will understand!

SHOULDER ANATOMY
Click Text For Info.

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The Unnamed Exercise
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Stand with your arms straight out (dumbbells in hands, top of hands facing the ceiling), and twist them inward (the opposite direction of your hands if you were doing a hammer curl exercise, outsides of hands facing each other). Now bring your arms out about 45 degrees in front of your shoulder (arms parallel to the ground), like you were in the middle of doing a set of dumbbell flies.

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Have You Ever Suffered A Rotator Cuff Injury?

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Slowly bring your arms up (stiff), almost even with your shoulder. Once you get to this point, bring them down slowly, and continue this motion until you can't do any more reps. Okay, let's track: Top of hands facing each other, 45 degrees in front of you, and slowly bring them up.

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Conclusion
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If you can do these 2-3 times per week, 3 sets of 10 reps, your shoulders should be fine and you should have no trouble with your rotator cuff. Just remember to go light at first, and tone it, don't build it!

RELATED VIDEO


The Poe Show:
Episode #6: Shoulder Training!

Learn proper form for safely training your shoulders (anterior, medial, and posterior deltoids) - without injuring your rotator cuff. Watch and learn, watch and learn...

Click The Play Button To Start The Video.
Or Download Here:
Windows Media (77.2 MB) - Video iPod (82.1 MB)
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