Reading Nutritional Labels

If you live in the States or other countries that have nutritional labels, I suggest you try to understand what those labels mean.
Reading food labels for their nutritional content and value shouldn't be hard to do in America since packaged food products have them by law. If you live in the States or other countries that have nutritional labels, I suggest you try to understand what those labels mean.

Other Countries

In those countries that do not have the convenience of nutritional labels, I suggest to get the information and try to understand what 2% milk (low fat), whole milk or what 20%, 15% lean, 7% extra lean ground beef means for examples. 2% does not mean 2% total milk fat content in an 8-ounce glass. What it really boils down to is a staggering 33% milk fat content per serving! One third of the total calories are derived from fat!

Check the label and do your math! 20% lean ground beef does not refer to the whole package content or per serving (4 ounces) or whatever else you might have thought. In actuality the total percent fat content per serving or per package amounts to over an astonishing 70%! The rest of the 30% constitutes its protein content.

More Information

For more information on food content and nutritional value I recommend purchasing a book that has total calories, protein, fat, carbohydrates, potassium, sodium, etc.