Randy's Advanced 6-day Routine!

If you are an advanced trainee, want to lose fat or get into contest shape quickly and wish to gain more muscle due to a greater blood flow to the working muscles. Read on!
If you are an advanced trainee, want to lose fat or get into contest shape quickly and wish to gain more muscle due to a greater blood flow to the working muscles though larger capillaries owing to higher rep range/cardiovascular type training than normal this routine is for you!

If the intensity of your mind is ignited, if you are making the mind/body connection, if you have the resolve to endure pain to stimulate growth (see my Mindful Athleticism article) during each mini circuit and your diet is similar to the ratio below (under the "Nutrition" subheading) my "High-Pulse" routine is a definite way to DEFINE or CUT-UP!

KEEP YOUR HEART RATE ELEVATED!

Sustain a minimum target heart rate (see the paragraph below) of at least 60% (weight management) and at most 85% (increased fitness) of your maximum heart rate for the duration of each mini circuit.

Which means NO RESTING between exercises in each circuit of exercises (if you can help it) except only to move from one exercise to the other to keep the pace up.

Setting up the next mini circuit and catching your breath is your only permissible rest time. Keep tabs on the allotted time to complete each circuit as described below.

FIGURING TARGET HEART RATE

To know your target heart rate (THR) you first should know your maximum heart rate (MHR). Subtract your age from 220. This would be your maximum heart rate. A 40-year-old male or female for example would be 220 - 40 = 180. His or her max heart rate is 180 beats per minute.

Next, figure your resting heart rate. It's best to take your resting heart rate just after you become conscious in the morning. This is your "true resting heart rate." Gently place your index and middle fingers over the wrist. You should feel a light pulsation. Count the number of beats for 6 seconds and multiply by 10. This gives your resting heart rate. The lower your resting heart rate the better shape you are in. It means your heart is able to pump a higher volume of blood with one stroke as opposed to taking two strokes for the same amount. Thus, your heart is stronger enabling it to rest longer between strokes or beats.

After that, subtract your resting heart rate from your maximum heart rate. Say our example 40-year old has a resting heart rate of 55. Subtract the resting heart rate (55) from the max heart rate (180) = 125. From this figure (125) multiply your desired exercise intensity* using the "Training Zone" chart below. If you choose 76% (desiring increased fitness) the figure will be 95 (125 x 76% = 95).

Finally, the 40-year-old individual adds his or her resting heart rate to 95. 95 + 55 = 150. This individual's "low end" target heart rate or target heart rate value during exercise should be kept at or above 150 beats per minute (bpm) for at least 20 minutes if cardio exercise to have any effect on his or her body for increased fitness.

There are two different ways to calculate your maximum heart rate and your target heart rates. Here are the two different ways!

Simple Target Heart Rate Calculator
Using the 220 - Age formula.

Enter Your Age - Then press Calculate.
Maximum
Heart Rate
Target
Heart Rate per minute
(75% - 85% of Max)
Target
Heart Rate
15 sec count

The Karvonnen formula is more advanced since it also takes into account your resting heart rate. This is your heart rate at complete rest. To determine this, take your pulse for 60 seconds just before you get out of bed ... or take it for 30 seconds and multiply by 2.

Advanced Target Heart Rate Calculator
Using the Karvonen Formula.

  • For your age, use a whole year. (Between 0 and 100)
  • Put your Resting Heart Rate in the next box. (Between 30 and 100)
  • In the % box, use a number between 50 and 85. Do not include the %.
  • Click on the Calculate button, and it will calculate your target heart rate or that percentage.
Your Age in Years
Resting Heart Rate
% of Maximum Effort
Your Target Heart Rate
%


"Training Zone" Chart

Effort
*Percent of MHR
Objective
Fitness Level
Intensity
1 to 3 0 to 59% Moderate Activity Easy Low
4 to 6 60 to 75% Weight Management Endurance Moderate
7 to 8 76 to 89% Increased Fitness Endurance Edge High
9 to 10 90 to 100% Improved Performance Elite Very High

HEART RATE MONITOR WATCH

Wearing a heart rate monitor is an excellent way of monitoring the intensity of your cardiovascular exercise and provides the knowledge of how fit or unfit you are. It motivates you to stay within your target heart rate or "training zone" to reap desired benefits in the least amount of time. A heart monitor watch also protects you by letting you know when too much is too much for your heart. It lets you know how easy or hard you are training - when to push it, when to back off and when to stay put.

THE "HIGH-PULSE" DIFFERENCE

The difference between my 6-day "High-Pulse" Circuit Routine as opposed to the traditional string of random exercises placed side-by-side is that body parts are necessarily grouped together in a so-called mini circuit so particular muscle groups will be thoroughly fatigued or exhausted before moving on to the next group of muscles of a mini circuit to do the same.

A mini circuit lasts anywhere from 10-20 minutes compared to a traditional circuit lasting 30 minutes after completing 3 sets of each given exercise (usually ten). The traditional is less intense for the cardiovascular system and your muscle machinery because each body part has more time to rest, and thus, ineffective for quicker long lasting results. The name of the game, even doing circuit training, is the consistency of TRAINING HARD, not long throughout the duration of your training session.

"FREE-FALLING" EXERCISES

The best exercises used for this routine is "free-falling" or free-weight exercises that usually consist of basic compound exercises using barbell, dumbbell pressing or pushing movements.

Since these require more energy than machine exercises by forcing you to control the movement of each rep when fatigue sets in. Perhaps the only machine necessary is the leg curl for the leg bicep or hamstring muscles to properly isolate these muscles when doing the circuit.

USING MY "HIGH-PULSE" ROUTINE

Maintain a 15 to 20-rep range for each set. Move from one exercise to the other without rest. For example, after completing a set of standard Lying Leg Raises, move into and position yourself to do Floor Crunches, and then follow these by doing Oblique-Leg Raise Crunches. For calves, hams and quads first do a set of calf raises for 15-20 reps followed by a set of leg curls for 15-20 reps and then a set of squats for 15-20 reps.

Repeat this sequence three more times for a total number of 12 sets. For variation change the order of circuits. Instead of doing the order of circuits as indicated on Monday below vary it by first doing Circuit 3, then Circuit 4 and finally Circuit 2. Always make Circuit 1 your first circuit.

If would be advisable to utilize Reverse Pyramid Training (refer to my article) and start with your heaviest weight you can handle for at least 15 and up to 20 reps, since fatigue will set in at each succeeding set. Thus, Reverse Pyramid Training allows you to maintain your rep range.

MY WEEKLY "HIGH-PULSE" CIRCUIT ROUTINE

SUNDAY - Abs, Calves, Hams, Quads, Cardio

Mini Circuit 1 (1 tri-set, 1 set each, 3 sets total) - Abs: Tri-set (one set each to fatigue for any many reps you can do) - Floor, Sit-Up or Roman Chair Crunches

Lying Leg Raises, Reverse Crunches or Hanging Leg Raises
Floor Oblique Crunches, Roman Chair Oblique Crunches, Oblique-Leg Raise Crunches or Hanging Oblique Leg Raises.
Time: 5 minutes

Mini Circuit 2 (3 tri-sets, 4 sets each, 12 sets total) - Calves: Seated or Standing Calf Raises

Hams: Lying or Seated Leg Curls
Quads: Squats, Hack Squats or Leg Extensions. Repeat this sequence three more times.
Time: 20 minutes

Cardio - Sustain 60% to 85% intensity of your maximum heart rate.
Time: 30 minutes

MONDAY - Abs, Chest, Back, Shoulders, Traps, Biceps, Triceps, Forearms

Mini Circuit 1 (1 tri-set, 1 set each, 3 sets total) - Abs: Tri-set (one set each to fatigue for any many reps you can do) - Floor, Sit-Up or Roman Chair Crunches

Lying Leg Raises, Reverse Crunches or Hanging Leg Raises
Floor Oblique Crunches, Roman Chair Oblique Crunches, Oblique-Leg Raise Crunches or Hanging Oblique Leg Raises.
Time: 5 minutes

Mini Circuit 2 (2 giant-sets consisting of 4 exercises, 2 sets each, 8 sets total)

Chest: Bench Press or Incline Press
Back: Bent-Over Barbell Rows, Good Mornings, Dumbbell or Barbell Deadlifts
Chest: Dumbbell Flyes or Bar Dips
Back: Lat Pull-downs, T-Bar Rows or Cable Rows

Repeat this sequence once more.
Time: 10 minutes

Mini Circuit 3 (2 giant-sets consisting of 6 exercises, 2 sets each, 12 sets total)

Front Delts: Standing Military (in front or behind neck) Press
Front Traps: Barbell Shrugs
Side Delts: Dumbbell Lateral Raises
Rear Traps: Smith Machine Shrugs Behind the Neck
Rear Delts: Bent-Over Lateral Raises
Delt-Trap Tie-in: Upright Rows
Repeat this sequence once more.
Time: 20 minutes

Mini Circuit 4 (3 tri-sets for biceps & triceps and 2 tri-sets for forearms, consisting of 5 exercises, 2-3 sets each, 12 sets total)

Biceps: Standing Barbell or Dumbbell Curls
Triceps: Bar Dips, Standing Kampered Bar French Press or Pushdowns
Forearms: Reverse Curls
Wrist Curls
Extensor Curls
Repeat biceps & triceps a second time
Repeat forearms once more
Repeat biceps & triceps once more.
Time: 20 - 25 minutes

Tuesday - Same as Sunday: Abs, Calves, Hams, Quads, Cardio

Wednesday - Same as Monday: Abs, Chest, Back, Shoulders, Traps, Biceps, Triceps and Forearms, but performing three powerlifting exercises for the necessity of increasing or maintaining strength by performing one set each for a 2-4 rep max (RM) in the bench press, squat and deadlift. These powerlifting exercises should be done after the completion of Circuit 1 (serving as a warm-up to strengthen the core [ab] muscles) and before the execution of Circuit 2.

These power lifts may take up to 30 minutes (squats and deadlifts will probably take a longer warm-up than bench press) to complete due to the warm-ups prior to attempting your RM's. Take your time to warm-up to prepare your body and mind and EXPLODE YOUR ENERGY when it comes time to performing your 2-4 RM!

    Powerlifting time: 30 minutes plus
    Circuits 1 & 2 through 4: 60 minutes
    Total time for Wednesday: 90 minutes

Thursday - Same as Sunday and Tuesday: Abs, Calves, Hams, Quads, Cardio

Friday - Same as Monday: Abs, Chest, Back, Shoulders, Traps, Biceps, Triceps, Forearms

Saturday - REST

Sunday - Repeat

NUTRITION

Since following my "High-Pulse" training routine I've adjusted my diet as outlined below (compared to what I used to be consuming as indicated in my Too Much Protein? article).

Calories - 2,250 to 2,450
Protein - 350 grams or 57% to 62% from total calories
Carbohydrates - 100 to 150 grams or 18% to 24% from total calories
Fat - 50 grams or 18% to 20% from total calories

My average ratio consists of 60% protein (a 15% increase difference), 20% carbohydrates (a 15% decrease difference) and 20% fat (no change). Note the energy exchange of protein and carbohydrates compared to my diet when I was utilizing my Advanced Muscle-Building and Fat Loss Training Regimen!

I have basically increased my protein by another 50 grams, which amounts to an extra 2 ½ more servings of Optimum Nutrition's 100% Pure Whey Protein, and decreased my carbohydrates by 50 grams, from 200 to 150 grams. This decrease in carbohydrates amounts to 1 serving as opposed to 2 servings of oatmeal and less the 8 oz. orange juice I used to have mixed with my protein before a training session.

SUPPLEMENTS

My daily supplement intake consists of:

Copyright © 2002 Randy M. Herring

Thanks,