Muscleology(TM): Back Training With Lauren Pearlman!

Welcome to Muscleology and the latest back workout with special guest, Lauren Pearlman. See what her current workout is below and get more shredded for the summer. Try it out!

Natural Muscle, July 2006 Natural Muscle Magazine: June/July 2006.

The June/July issue of Natural Muscle is now available. This issue will showcase Fitness International, Fitness Over 40, Testosterone Boosting Supplementation and much more! Check it out!

Download the June/July 2006 Issue (PDF Format):

    June/July 2006. PDF (4.6 MB)


Muscleology:
Get Shredded This Summer!

The time has come when everyone is digging in their closet to find that hot swimsuit that looked amazing last summer. The problem is once you put it on, you start critiquing your physique and what body part you want to improve on. STOP putting off cleaning up your diet and just do it!

Make a commitment to yourself to include more salads in your diet, and cut back on the portions of food that you consume at one meal. Cut the bread and starches in your diet in half and drink plenty of water. Pick Three days to consistently incorporate 45 min. to 1 hour of some type of cardiovascular activity into your weekly routine.

Remember to maintain a lean physique it is imperative to BURN MORE Calories than you TAKE IN. Make a commitment to yourself and Get Shredded This Summer!!!

RELATED ARTICLE
Get Shredded For Summer! Get Shredded For Summer!
In order to get ready with any sense of physical decency, we need to address the fundamentals in three specific segments - training, supplementation and lifestyle. Let's start with what you can do in the gym.
[ Click here to learn more. ]


Special Feature

This month's special feature is Lauren Pearlman. She is currently a Personal Trainer at US Fitness in Delray Beach. She has been training people for the last 7 years and stays active in other fitness programs. Lauren competes in Figure Shows and plans to compete June 10th in West Palm Beach and July 14th at the Southern States. If you would like to contact her with any fitness questions email her at LaurenP79@aol.com.

Lauren's Current Workout Is:

  • Monday - Hamstrings/Glutes/Cardio
  • Tuesday - Back/Shoulders (Heavy Day) Cardio
  • Wednesday - Biceps/Triceps/Cardio
  • Thursday - Quads/Calves/Cardio
  • Friday - Back/Shoulders (Drop Sets) Cardio
  • Saturday - Cardio
  • Sunday - OFF.

In this kenesiology segment we are taking a look at the muscles in the Back region. I will focus on some of the prime movers of the back region. The muscle groups we will cover are as follows:

  • Latissimus Dorsi
  • Rhomboideus
  • Erector spinae
  • Teres Major & Minor
  • Infraspinatus
  • Iliocostalis
  • Trapezius
  • Levator Auguli Scapulae

This segment will help supply you with the proper information to help improve your form.

The exercises that we will cover are as follows:

    I. Seated High Pulls
    II. One Arm Dumbbell Rows
    III. Horizontal
    IV. Standing Cable Rows.

In these different exercises we will cover muscles that are emphasized (Heavy & Moderate), execution, form, muscelology, and the anatomy of each exercise. Remember to always start out light and slow when attempting any exercises in these articles.

Always consult a professional trainer, if you are having any problems with these exercises. Until next issues Dynamic Core segment, continue making time for your health & fitness goals. Be Focused, Driven, and continue to make Lifestyle changes.

You're Performance Is Our Passion. GOD BLESS


I. Seated High Pulls

Muscleology Muscleology
Click Image To Enlarge.
Seated High Pulls.
Video Guide: Windows Media - MPEG - Video iPod

    Muscle Position & Execution:

    • Hands in (pronated) overhand position
    • Start with arms fully extended
    • Pull arms back keeping elbows high, squeezing scapulas together
    • Pull the bar to the top of the chest, keeping the chest out at the end of movement

    Tips & Form:

    • Always keep a tight grip with thumb wrapped around index fingers
    • Control the bar as you come back to the starting position each time
    • Blow out the air when pulling bar back on each repetition (concentric phase)
    • Breathe in when returning to the starting position of each rep (eccentric phase)

    Muscleology:

      The Latissimus dorsi's main function during this movement is adduction. Adduction: is pulling the arms and elbows down to the sides of the body from and overhead position. The teres minor and the infraspinatus's primary action are to rotate the humerus in the outward movement when the arm is in a raised position.

      They also serve to protect the shoulder joint from being injured. The main function of the Rhomboids is a slight rotation of the scapula upwards and backwards, flexing the muscles towards the spine.

    Muscle Anatomy:

      The latuissimus dorsi is a broad flat muscle that arises form the external lip of the crest of the ilium (hip). Its fibers virtually all run in a parallel direction covering the lumbar and the lower half of the dorsal (lower back) regions. As these fibers run toward the top of the latissimus, the muscles becomes narrow and "cordlike" and inserts into the humerus bone (upper arm bone). The latissimus muscle is what gives the body its "V" like appearance.

Muscleology
Click Image To Enlarge.
Muscle Anatomy.


II. One Dumbbell Rows:

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Click Image To Enlarge.
One Dumbbell Rows.
Video Guide: Windows Media - Real Player

    Muscle Position & Execution:

    • Place one knee on the bench and foot on the floor
    • Start with dumbbells in the extended position
    • Keep head in one position throughout movement
    • Pull arms and elbows to the back, keeping elbows in tight to the side of body
    • Squeeze for two seconds at the top of the movement

    Tips & Form:

    • Pull dumbbells into side of rib cage
    • Use a weight that you can control, this movement should be light
    • Blow out air at the top of each repetition
    • Keep slight arch in back and pull your shoulder back slightly at the top of this movement

    Muscleology:

      All three parts of the Erector spinae work together to extend the trunk of the body.

    Muscle Anatomy:

      The Erector spinae attaches the spines of the sacrum internally, and arises in a very wide surface across the lumbar region of the low back, and functions as an extension muscle (trunk extension). The iliocostalis is the external or lateral layer of the erector spinae and is found to possess nine or ten tendons that insert into all angles of the ribs.


III. Horizontal Lat Pullups:

Muscleology Muscleology
Click Image To Enlarge.
Horizontal Lat Pullups.
Video Guide: Windows Media - MPEG

    Muscle Position & Execution:

    • Adjust Smith Machine bar approximately 3 feet from the floor
    • Lying on the floor reach up and grab the bar
    • Place hands wider than shoulder width
    • Pull chest towards the bar in a controlled fashion keeping the knees slightly bent
    • Squeeze shoulder blades together and keep chest out on each repetition

    Tips & Form:

    • Always keep abs tight
    • Wide grip will put more pressure on the latissimus
    • Keep back straight and ads tight and chest out at the top of each movement
    • At the top of each movement squeeze and blow out the air

    Muscleology:

      The Teres minor and the Infraspinatus primary action is to rotate the humerus in the outward movement when the arm is in a raised position. They also serve to protect the shoulder joint from being injured.

    Muscle Anatomy: (Same as Section I.)


IV. Standing Cable Rows:

Muscleology Muscleology
Click Image To Enlarge.
Standing Cable Rows.
Video Guide: Windows Media - MPEG

    Muscle Position & Execution:

    • Keep feet shoulder width apart
    • Hands in (neutral) thumbs-up position
    • You can use different types of handles to get a closer or wider grip
    • Start with arms in fully extended position
    • Pull arms back using one fluid motion
    • Release the bar back to the starting position in a controlled fashion

    Tips & Form:

    • Use a weight that can be controlled, not jerked up
    • Blow out air at the top of the movement and pause two seconds
    • Very slightly pull your shoulders back at top of movement to get full contraction out back muscles

    Muscleology:

      The Trapezuis primary action is to retract the scapula and braces back and the shoulders. The middle and lower fibers of the Trapezuis work in the action of rotating the scapula. The Levator scapula is primary used in the shrugging action of the shoulders. The main action of the Rhomboids is a slight rotation of the scapula upwards and backwards, flexing the muscles towards the spine.

Muscle Anatomy:

    The Trapezuis muscle is a large triangular muscle that is on the first layer of the back just beneath the skin. The fibers in the Trapezuis (Top, Middle, Lower) run in three different directions. The top fibers run down and outwards to the rear part of the shoulder. The fibers in the midregion run straight across the Trapezuis, and the lower region that runs upwards, toward the rear part of the deltoid.

    For more information on Muscleology videos, clothing, products, and nutritional information Call 1-877-283-4338 or visit us at our website www.muscleology.com.

Muscleology
Click Image To Enlarge.
Lauren Pearlman & Eric Hoult B.S.

References:

  1. Franis, P. Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology. Supplemental materials. (San Diego: KB Books,1999)

  2. Gray, Henry, F.R.S. Anatomy Descriptive and Surgical, 15th ed. (New York: Barnes & Noble,1995), 401 to 406

  3. Greene, Paul. Kinesiology: Movement in the context of activity (St. Louis: Mosby, 1999)

  4. Rasch, P.J. Kinesiology and Applied Anatomy, 7th ed. (Lea and Febiger, 1993)

Reprinted with permission from Natural Muscle Magazine.

Photo's by Axisdzn.com

Natural Muscle, July 2006 Natural Muscle Magazine: June/July 2006.

The June/July issue of Natural Muscle is now available. This issue will showcase Fitness International, Fitness Over 40, Testosterone Boosting Supplementation and much more! Check it out!

Download the June/July 2006 Issue (PDF Format):

    June/July 2006. PDF (4.6 MB)