How The Bodybuilding Supplement Tea Can Enhance Health!

Tea is the second most commonly consumed beverage worldwide, with good reason. Tea is a calorie-free beverage bursting with natural benefits. If you get bored with water, brew a cup of tea and toast to good health.

Tea is the second most commonly consumed beverage worldwide, with good reason. Tea is a calorie-free beverage bursting with natural benefits. If you get bored with water, brew a cup of tea and toast to good health.

What Is Green Tea?

Each of the four types of tea—green, black, white and oolong—are made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant. The differences in color and taste among each kind of tea are due to differences in the processing of the tea leaves. For instance, black tea is made by allowing the tea leaves to oxidize for a few hours, whereas the tea leaves are not oxidized at all when green tea is made. Oolong tea is made from tea leaves that are partially oxidized, and white tea is made from very young tea leaves that are not oxidized.

Each of the four types of tea—green, black, white and oolong—are made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant.
"Each of the four types of tea—green, black, white and oolong—are made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant."

Even though each of the four types of tea are made by using different processing techniques, even within a category of tea there are large differences in taste depending on whether the tea is loose or in a bag, where and when the tea leaves were picked, and more. Therefore, your tastes buds will notice that no two types of green tea taste the same.

Herbal tea isn't actually tea and therefore doesn't have the same health benefits associated with tea.

How Green Tea Can Enhance Health

Tea Is Loaded With Polyphenols

Polyphenols are plant-based compounds associated with a decrease in free-radical-induced damage that contributes to some types of chronic disease.

Tea Helps You Focus And Concentrate

One complaint some people have about caffeine is the overstimulation—the bouncing-off-the-walls effect. Turn to tea and you'll feel focused yet relaxed. Tea is a natural source of both caffeine and the amino acid L-theanine. Both substances increase alertness but L-theanine also increases alpha-brain wave activity inducing relaxation. Studies show that L-theanine reduces psychological and physiological stress and produces a dose-dependent relaxed yet alert state about 40 minutes after consumption. One study found that together, 250 mg caffeine and 150 mg L-theanine led to faster simple reaction time, faster numeric working memory reaction time, and improved sentence verification accuracy.

One complaint some people have about caffeine is the over stimulation—the bouncing off the walls effect. Turn to tea and you'll feel focused yet relaxed.
"One complaint some people have about caffeine is the over stimulation—the bouncing off the walls effect. Turn to tea and you'll feel focused yet relaxed."
Tea May Help Decrease Neurological Decline

In an animal study, the main catechin (an antioxidant) in tea, EGCG (aka epigallocatechin gallate) was found to decrease biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease. In addition, population-based studies suggest that tea drinking may be associated with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease. It could be the theanine and EGCG in tea, or the synergistic effect of many of tea's natural components that benefits the brain. Either way, a potential benefit with no drawback is a win-win situation.

Tea May Protect Against Cardiovascular Disease

The polyphenols in tea may prevent the oxidation of LDL cholesterol (typically known as "harmful" cholesterol, though there are likely differences in the four types of LDL), thereby inhibiting the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. And according to at least one study, green tea may also help decrease LDL (not just the oxidation of LDL) and increase HDL (good) cholesterol.

Tea Drinkers Have A Lower Rate Of Cardiovascular Disease
Studies show that three or more cups of black tea per day may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke.
"Studies show that three or more cups of black tea per day may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke."

Epidemiological studies show that increased tea consumption is linked to lower rates of cardiovascular disease. In one 11-year study examining 40,530 Japanese adults aged 40 to 79 years without a history of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer, found that green-tea consumption was inversely associated with mortality due to cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality (death overall). Those who drank more green tea were less likely to develop cardiovascular disease.

Several population-based studies show that people who consume three or more cups of black tea per day have a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke. Tea may improve functioning of blood vessels, platelet function and reduce oxidative damage in arteries. But black tea isn't the only winner here. Some studies also show that green-tea consumption is linked to lower rates of cardiovascular disease.

Tea May Help Decrease One's Risk Of Certain Types Of Cancer

The flavonoids (a class of antioxidants) in tea may decrease cancer risk by combating free-radical damage and inhibiting out-of-control cell growth. Studies show some promise for digestive cancers, prostate cancer, skin cancer, oral cancers, lung cancer, and ovarian cancer.

Tea May Increase Immune Functioning

Theanine in tea may help the immune system fight infection, bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Tea May Help Fight Obesity And Boost Metabolism

First and foremost, tea is a calorie-free beverage that can fill you up so you don't mistake thirst for hunger. In addition, some preliminary research shows that tea may help us fight the battle of the bulge. Studies show that green tea extract has been shown to increase 24-hour energy expenditure and fat oxidation in healthy men and consumption of green tea extract over a 3-month period led to decreased body weight and waist circumference in moderately obese adults. Other animal and human studies have also shown that tea may help us with the battle of the bulge.

Studies show that green tea extract has been shown to increase 24-hour energy expenditure and fat oxidation in healthy men.
"Studies show that green tea extract has been shown to increase 24-hour energy expenditure and fat oxidation in healthy men."

Additional Tips To Enhancing Health

Get Regular Checkups

If you wait to change your oil or get something fixed on your car, it typically costs more and waiting may cause more problems. Think of your body like a top of the line classic automobile—take care of it and it will run better for a longer period of time.

Talk To Your Health Insurance

New changes are coming down the pipeline as the result of health-care reform. Each year, your health insurance will change, and it's important to stay current on these changes. If you use tobacco, many plans have already started adding a surcharge to their monthly premium because of the increased health care costs associated with using tobacco. In addition, some private companies have shut their doors to tobacco users—they won't hire you if you smoke, dip or chew.

Conclusion

Each of the four types of tea comes with a variety of health benefits. Therefore, if you don't love green tea, try white, black or oolong (or the flavored varieties found in tea bags or loose tea). Or, consider a green tea extract product*. Tea is a calorie-free beverage that will hydrate you and contribute to better overall health.

* Always remember to talk to your doctor before taking any dietary supplement.

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