What Is A Good Workout For A Boxer?

A conditioning specialist in Scottsdale, Arizona. He holds a Bachelor's of Science in Exercise Science. His articles will help you!
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What Is A Good Workout Program For A Boxer?

I'm 24, male, 6-foot-1, 220 pounds, with no injury history. I currently train with weights 4 times a week for about 45 minutes a session. I take 3 whey shakes a day in between meals and creatine after weights. I have been training this way on and off for 4 years now.

My diet sucks because I eat fast food almost everyday which leaves me with about 15-16% bodyfat. About 6 months ago I started taking a boxing class. Up until now I was going 2-3 times a week but now want to get in to serious shape so I want to bump it up to 5-6 days a week. Although I have no plans of ever turning pro I still would like to be the best boxer I can be.

I need a weight program that is good for a boxer, because I have noticed in the boxing articles I have read that the bodybuilding workouts I read in "buff" magazines aren't the best for sports. Would hitting the weights 3 or 4 times a week be good enough? Because of school and work, I will probably have to hit the weights first thing in the morning and box in the afternoon before work. Any help you can give me would be great!

You are exactly right when you said most bodybuilding programs are not appropriate for athletics. The main reason is that most bodybuilding styles of training do not work on improving maximal strength, speed-strength, strength-speed, etc. These are all important components of overall strength development.

In boxing or any combative sport you need to be aware that large muscles can actually be dangerous. This is because when someone possesses large muscles you can actually see the muscle contract before certain actions take place, like a punch. When you then compete against a skilled opponent they will see these actions coming and make you pay.

Training 3-4 days seems optimal, especially considering the amount of work you want to devote to other forms of training. Therefore, you need to make sure you make the best of your time with weights. Concentrating on compound movements will be of most importance. These lifts not only improve strength most effectively, they also aid in improving the actions of the neuromuscular system for actions in most sporting actions.

There are many ways to design a program. A lot depends on your training history, how much time you have available, your current strengths and weaknesses, and how much time you are devoting to this boxing class. You could end up doing as little as 3-4 lifts, but as long as they are the most appropriate for your goals that is all that matters. Just try to avoid too much traditional hypertrophy methods (training with high reps and low weights) as this will do little to help your performance and has a great chance of making you sore which will impede your skill development.

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