Why Should I 'Push' As Much As I 'Pull' While Working Out?

A conditioning specialist in Scottsdale, Arizona. He holds a Bachelor's of Science in Exercise Science. His articles will help you!
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Why Should I "Push" As Much As I "Pull" While Working Out?

You indicated in your "Weak Links" article that if you push more than you pull, then you are probably a prime candidate. My max at bench press is 340 lbs and I usually work out with 225 lbs on the bench. So are you saying that I should be doing bent over barbell rows with 225 lbs plus?

This is a very good question and I could understand your confusion. Yes, I did mention that performing more pushing than pulling could be problematic. What I was referring to was the volume of work done. Meaning if you perform a total of 15 sets of chest, but only 5 sets of upper back work this predisposes you to muscle imbalances. A very easy rule of thumb is to make sure you perform a set of opposite muscle group for every set you complete for the agonist. Therefore, if you perform 12 sets for quadricep dominant exercises you should also train the hips with approximately with 12 sets. This also goes for the lower back and abdominals, biceps and triceps, etc.

You will never be able to row as much as you bench. Because of the support of being on a bench you will not be limited by the smaller muscle groups. Many times the lower back will fatigue before the upper back. The other reason that most will never row as much as they bench is because of the possible grip positions used in rowing. The overhand position in the row places the lats at a poor mechanical advantage, therefore decreasing the amount of weight lifted. This does not mean that this is not a beneficial lift, just that you should be aware how subtle changes of an exercise can cause such variations.

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