Conditioning & Hitting Drills For Tennis: Part 2.

Check out these great conditioning tips and hitting drills for tennis players! Learn how to improve your agility and ability to hit the ball!
Check Out More Drills For Tennis In Part 1 HERE!

2 And 1 Doubles Drill

One team of two people begin at the service line and the other team of two people start on the baseline. One of the players at the net begins each point. The drill is a game to twenty-one. The scoring is as follows. If the people at the net win the point off of a winner, they receive two points. If they win the point off of an error, they receive one point. The people at the baseline win two points if they hit a winner, or if they can get the ball to bounce in front of the two people at the net. They receive one point if they win the point off of an error as well. The first to twenty-one wins.

This drill is good practice for the people at the net because it gets them used to trying for every ball and it forces them to try and volley everything, which is very important in doubles. The closer you are to the net, the easier it is to put the ball away. The drill is also good for the people at the baseline because they are rewarded for trying for every ball as well because an error is only one point for the other team, while a winner is two points for the other team. Once someone reaches twenty-one, switch sides and let the people at the net be at the baseline and vice versa.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Blood And Guts

Two players stand on the service line on one side, and the other two players stand on the service line on the other side. Each pair of people is a team. Any player can start the rally. The players then exchange volleys and play out the point. The goal is to go through the other team. This does not mean to try and hit as hard as you can, it means that you want to improve your reflexes. In order to do this you need to try and go through the other person to show who has the better reflexes. This also improves your quickness because you need to react with your hands and feet very quickly. You do not want to swing on your volley; you want to punch them firmly.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Doubles Practice Drill

Four players are included in the drill and one player is feeding balls. On both sides of the court, one player is at the baseline on the deuce side and the other player is at the net on the ad side. The person in charge of feeding balls, feeds a ball to the person who is at the baseline on the opposite side. This person hits the ball back cross-court and all four people proceed to play the point out. The people who are on the baseline want to try to get to the net. This is the key, for it is easier to win the point in doubles if both players are at the net.

To add a little competition, a game can be played. The first team to reach eleven wins. Once this game is complete, switch and have one person at the net on the deuce side and one person at baseline on the ad side. Once this is complete, rotate so each player has a chance to be at the baseline and at the net, on both the deuce and ad sides.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Two Back, Two Back

This is a doubles drill. All four players begin at the baseline. Each side of two players is a team. One player feeds the ball to begin the rally and everyone plays out the point. This is a doubles drill so to the goal is to get to the net. As soon as the ball bounces inside the service line, the team whose side it bounced on must approach the net. This gets the players comfortable with approaching the net. The goal is to get to the net and win the point from the net, but be careful not to come to net on bad balls. Play a game in which the first team to reach fifteen wins.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Two Up, Two Back

Two people stand at the baseline and two people stand at the net. The two players at the net are a doubles team and the two players at the baseline are a doubles team. One person feeds the ball and everyone plays out the point. Doubles allies do NOT count. This drill helps to improve your doubles skills. Play a game in which the first team to reach eleven points wins. Once one team reaches eleven points, switch and have the team who was at the baseline be at the net and the team that was at the net move to the net.

This is a doubles drill played out on singles, court boundaries. This helps to keep rallies going and requires an excellent shot to receive a point.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Serve And Volley Cross-Court

One player is serving and the other player is returning. The point is played out cross-court. One player serves the ball from the deuce side to the opposite deuce side and follows it into the net. The other player returns the ball and can either come to net also, or stay back. The players then proceed to play the point out cross-court, as if playing on half-courts. Doubles allies do count. You can play a game to eleven if the players want to have a little competition. Once one player reaches eleven, repeat the same thing on the add side. Once this is complete, switch and have the person whom just served now return and the person who just returned now serve.

This drill works on both serving accuracy and return accuracy. By limiting the area to play with, the players must concentrate. Using competition also helps to keep the players motivated and working hard.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Serving To Cones

You need to take six tennis ball cans and set them up as targets. Place three cans in each service box. One should be located at the corner of the service line and the middle line on the deuce side. One should be placed in the middle of the box and the other should by place where the sideline meets the service line. The targets should be placed in the same places on the add court as well. Now take a basket of balls and practice serving at these targets. Hit approximately fifteen balls at each target. If you want to work on your wide serve you can move the cans that are where the service line meets the sideline. Move the cans about eighteen inches towards the net. Serving at these targets will give you something to aim at when you are playing a match.

Repetition is outstanding practice for serving. A player can serve until he knocks down each can or stick to a certain number at each target.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Two On One With One Person At The Net

Two players stand on the baseline, one on the deuce side, the other on the add side. The other player stands in the center of the court on the service line. The two players on the baseline feed a ball to start the rally, and the person at the net hits the ball to the corners. To get the most out of the drill, do not try to hit too hard. Keep the ball in play as long as possible. The goal is to move the net man around a lot so that he gets a good work out as well as practice hitting to the corners. After five to ten minutes rotate clockwise. After five to ten more minutes, rotate clockwise again so that everyone has a chance to be at the net.

Stress footwork and fundamentals for the player at the net. He will be executing volleys from many different angles and should alternate which side he hits to. However, do not follow a strict, left, right, left, right, pattern. Tennis is unpredictable and the net player must react to the ball.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Two-Man Suicide

Two players stand on the service line and the other person stands in the center of the court on the baseline. The person on the baseline should have a lot of balls because he is going to be feeding balls to the two people at the net. The person should feed around ten to fifteen balls in a row moving the people at the net around. This should include low balls, lobs, and some hard fed balls. Spacing is important when playing doubles. The main idea to remember when playing doubles is if your partner goes off the court to get a ball, you need to take a step towards the middle to try and cover up some of the open space. Once he gets back on the court, move back the position where you started. After ten or fifteen balls, rotate in two other players perhaps. Do again and again. Emphasize footwork.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Volleys On Backboard

This is a real simple drill to practice anywhere you can hit against a wall. Stand about five feet from the wall and work on hitting volleys. Try to hit the ball straight against the wall so you can work on your forehand volley. Then try to do the same for your backhand volley. It is important to try and volley every ball in the air.

Keep doing this until your arm is extremely fatigued. This will improve arm strength important to people who are learning tennis. Beginners often wear their arm out when they are volleying, and this can combine strengthening and volley practice.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Up And Back Overhead Drill

One person, the ball-feeder, stands on the baseline. The other player starts at the net. He touches the net with his racket, signaling the person on the baseline to feed him an overhead. He side steps back to hit the overhead. After he hits the overhead, he runs up and touches the net with his racket.

When he does this the person on the baseline feeds him another overhead. Repeat this until ten overheads have been hit. Then switch and have the person who was feeding balls now hit overheads. Repeat drill three times or more if necessary. This is a good drill to work on moving back for your overheads and to work on the scissor-kick jump that is necessary to jump for some overheads.

Submitted by: Brandon Kramer

Check Out More Drills For Tennis In Part 1 HERE!

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