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Lose The IUD To Lose FAT!

You train and train, diet, starve and pour metabolic stimulators down your throat, and you still can't lose weight. Why? Well we might have a possible explanation right here. Read on...

By: Dr. David Ryan

You train and train, diet, starve, and pour metabolic stimulators down your throat, but you still can't lose weight.

If you are lucky enough to have a social life, then some sexual problems might actually be preventing you from losing unwanted fat. Women who use IUDs as their chosen form of birth control are likely to gain weight according to some studies.

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Hormonal Stimulation

Several studies have determined that using an IUD is likely to result in weight gain due to the excessive hormonal stimulation associated with any of these devices.

Past experience with several figure/fitness competitors has confirmed the IUD's side effects.


About IUDs

Most IUDs from the past decade come in the "letter T" shape (like the image at the top of this page), although older versions included the following shapes: squiggly S, ram's horns, the number 7, and even a bug shape.

Dalkon Shield IUD
Click Image To Enlarge.
The Notorious, Bug-Shaped "Dalkon Shield".

There are common ones that have copper and others that have slow release hormones in them. All IUDs are merely designed to irritate the lining of the uterus so implantation can't occur.

top
What Does IUD Mean?
Intrauterine birth control device, which prevents implantation of an embryo into the uterus should fertilization occur.
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IUDs Vs. Fat Loss

The objective is simple: lose fat and get lean. The IUD has been clearly shown in making your body resistant towards weight loss. Discuss the options with your physician.

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Has An IUD Prohibited You From Losing Weight?

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Not Sure.

Obtain all the facts, including the fact that using oral contraceptives will likely result in weight gain, too. And last, but not least, you might consider the other individual using a contraceptive. In my opinion, however, the only solution is to have the device removed.


IUD Removal

Removal is pretty simple. The area is cleared and forceps are inserted into the canal, then the string is located and after a few slight pulls the whole process is over. Some serious complications with removal can be involved, however, so always seek a health professional to reduce the chance of injury or infection.

Other Symptoms That Can Indicate That You Might Need To Have Your IUD Removed:

  1. Ongoing bleeding and discharge w/ associated fever.
  2. Rash forming on the abdomen or legs w/ or w/out fever.
  3. Pelvic pain or pressure during or after exercise or sex.
  4. Other colored discharge from vaginal area.
  5. Pregnancy.
  6. Ongoing infections associated with the vaginal area.
  7. Ongoing bouts of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID).

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The Studies

The following article summaries are fairly technical, but offer valuable insight into IUDs and weight loss.


1. Weight Variation In A Cohort Of Women Using Copper
    IUD For Contraception.

    Objective:
    The objective of this study was to assess weight changes over time in reproductive-age women using non-hormonal contraception [copper intrauterine device (IUD) users]. Baseline variables recorded included age, parity, decade when the IUD was inserted and the presence of hypertension.

    A total of 1,697 IUD users were followed for 7 years of use. The mean age (+/- SD) of the women at the beginning of follow-up was 27.6 +/- 5.8 years and the mean height (+/- SD) was 150 +/- 10 cm.

    The mean weight (+/- SD) at the time of IUD insertion was 58.5 +/- 0.30 kg. After 5 and 7 years of follow-up, the mean weight (+/- SD) was 61.2 +/- 0.33 kg and 62.4 +/- 0.51 kg, respectively.

    At insertion, the body mass index mean (+/- SD) was 24.5 +/- 0.12 and after 3 years it was 25 +/- 0.14, remaining above 25 up to the 7th year of observation. During the 7 years of follow-up, older women gained more weight than younger women.

    Parity, decade of IUD insertion, and hypertension were not noted to be significant determinants of weight variation.

    Conclusion:
    In conclusion, this cohort of lower and middle class Brazilian copper IUD users tended to gain weight during their reproductive life, independent of other factors. These observations may improve counseling of women regarding the prevention of age-related obesity.

    Reference

    • Hassan DF, Petta CA, Aldrighi JM, Bahamondes L, Perrotti M. "Weight variation in a cohort of women using copper IUD for contraception." Contraception. 2003 Jul; 68(1):27-30. Human Reproduction Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6181, 13084-971, SP, Campinas, Brazil.

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     2. Comparison Of Weight Increase In Users Of Depot
         Medroxyprogesterone Acetate And Copper IUD Up To 5
         Years.

    Objective:
    The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the weight variation in long-term users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) compared to users of the TCu380A intrauterine device (IUD).

    A cohort of 206 healthy women allocated in two groups of 103 women according to the contraceptive method used was evaluated through 5 years.

    Each user of DMPA was paired with an IUD user by age (+/- 1 year) and weight (+/- 1 kg) at the beginning of the study. Weight was evaluated yearly during 5 years. The mean age at the beginning of the study was 33.1 years in both groups, and the mean weight was 59.4 kg in the IUD users and 60.4 kg in the DMPA group.

    Both cohorts of women presented significant weight increase at the end of the 5 years of observation (p < 0.001). However, DMPA users presented higher weight increase when compared to IUD users from the second through the fifth year of observation. The DMPA users increased weight by 4.3 kg during the 5 years, and IUD users increased 1.8 kg.

    Conclusion:
    In conclusion, DMPA users had a significantly higher weight increase when compared to IUD users. In addition, this cohort of women increased weight throughout the 5 years with the use of DMPA or IUD.

    Reference

    • Bahamondes L, Del Castillo S, Tabares G, Arce XE, Perrotti M, Petta C. "Comparison of weight increase in users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate and copper IUD up to 5 years." Contraception. 2001 Oct; 64(4):223-5. Human Reproduction Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, Brazil. bahamond@caism.unicamp.br.

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     3. Weight Change In Adolescents Who Used Hormonal
         Contraception.

    Purposes:

    1. To compare weight change at 1 year between adolescents 13-19 years old who were using either depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or oral contraceptives (OC)

    2. To determine if age, baseline body mass index (BMI), race/ethnicity, or weight gain at 3 months predicted which subjects would gain excessive weight.

    Method:
    The setting was a Planned Parenthood Teen Clinic with chart review of variables of interest. Excessive weight was defined as weight gain > 10%.

    Results:
    Baseline variables were similar in the two groups, except that DMPA users (n = 44) had a greater mean BMI (t test, p = .05) than OC users (n = 86). Mean (standard deviation) and median weight gains at 1 year were 3.0 (4.5) and 2.4 kg in the DMPA users and 1.3 (3.9) and 1.5 kg in the OC users (difference in medians not significant, Wilcoxon rank sum test, p = .10).

    Fifty-six percent of DMPA and 70% of OC users lost weight or gained < 5% of their baseline weight (p = .17, Fisher exact test); 25% of DMPA users and 7% of OC users gained > 10% of their baseline weight (p = .006). Age, baseline BMI, or race/ethnicity did not affect the likelihood that either group would gain > 5% or > 10% of their baseline weight.

    Of adolescents who gained > 5% of baseline weight at 3 months, 13 of 14 (93%) gained even more weight at 12 months.

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    Conclusions:
    The majority of adolescents who used hormonal contraception for 1 year lost weight or gained < 5% of baseline weight. DMPA users were more likely than OC users to gain > 10%. Subjects who gained > 5% of baseline weight at 3 months were at high risk (93%) of gaining even more weight by 1 year.

    PIP:
    This study aims to compare weight change after 1 year between adolescents aged 13-19 years who were using either depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or an oral contraceptive (OC).

    It also seeks to determine whether age, baseline body mass index (BMI), race/ethnicity, or weight gain at 3 months predicted which subjects would gain excessive weight (defined as weight gain 10%).

    A total of 2883 charts were reviewed for all clients attending the Planned Parenthood Teen Clinic in Texas. In the results, 56% of DMPA and 70% of OC users lost weight or gained 5% of their baseline weight; whereas 25% of DMPA users and 7% of OC users gained 10% of their baseline weight.

    Furthermore, age, baseline BMI, or race/ethnicity did not affect the likelihood of weight gain in both groups. The findings indicated that most adolescents who used hormonal contraception for 1 year lost weight or gained 5% of their baseline weight.

    DMPA users were more likely to gain 10% of their baseline weight compared to OC users. Subjects who gained 5% of baseline weight at 3 months were at high risk (93%) of gaining even more weight by 1 year.

    Reference

    1. Risser WL, Gefter LR, Barratt MS, Risser JM. "Weight change in adolescents who used hormonal contraception." J Adolesc Health. 1999 Jun; 24(6):433-6. Department of Pediatrics and School of Public Health, University of Texas-Houston Health Sciences Center, USA.

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Lose The IUD To Lose FAT!
DTRRYAN@aol.com

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