Cory Gregory's Squat Every Day: Program Overview

Squat every day to add total-body strength, size, and a massive serving of mental fortitude to your gym repertoire. This is for the hardcore.

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Most people try to squat once per week. And by "try," I mean I see guys squatting a quarter of the way down, skipping sets, and doing more talking than actual work. I built this trainer on the premise that, every single day, you're going to shut up and you're going to squat.

You're not doing leg press or Smith machine squats. You're putting actual weight on an actual barbell and you're free squatting. That's how this program works. It might sound crazy, but it's meant to be hard. There is no "easy" mode. Make it tough and reap the rewards.

By going through this program, you'll not only get physically stronger, but you'll also increase your muscle mass and become an expert in the squat movement pattern itself. If your goal coming here was to find a plan that challenges you in every way, then you've found it. After you squat every day, everything else will seem easy.

Squat Every Day Program Overview
Watch the Video - 9:56

Squat Every Day Origins

In March of 2014, I had a powerlifting meet that I bombed out in. In this case, bombing out means that I didn't hit any of my squats. Because I did so poorly, they told me to sit down for the rest of the meet and watch. It wasn't very fun.

So, I decided I needed to do something crazy to increase my squat. I did some online research and came across an article by a renowned lifting coach based in Las Vegas named John Broz.

Broz said to squat heavy on a daily basis to increase your max and overall strength. At first, I balked at the idea, but after reading more about John's concept of squatting every day and seeing the success his lifters have had, I took some of his ideas and mixed them with some concepts from Louie Simmons's Westside conjugate training system.

"Broz said to squat heavy on a daily basis to increase your max and overall strength."

As soon as I tried, I was hooked. I realized that you can fit a year of squatting into three months, or two years into six months. I also realized that the squat is a basic human movement pattern, and a critically important one. If it's important, I believe you should do it every day. Why wait to get strong?

If you're a gym novice or simply worried that you can't handle daily squats, toss that worry aside. "I had three different kids at three different levels start this program at the same time," says Broz. "One year later, they all made identical gains. They all went up almost 200 pounds in their squat in a year. So, no matter where you start, you can make progress. Nobody has a monopoly on strength. Everybody can get stronger."

Squat Every Day Split

Yes, you'll be doing your squats every day, but you're also going to be hitting your normal split after them. Starting at the squat rack will set an intense tone for the rest of your workout. Believe me; it will prime your body for hard work and significant growth.

Over the next 30 days, you'll learn and do 11 squat variations. So, each day you'll squat a little differently, testing yourself under slightly different loads and patterns. No matter what variation you do, though, you need to bring your very best effort to the rack. Anything less would be disrespectful.

"No matter what variation you do, though, you need to bring your very best effort to the rack."

You might be thinking you're going to be in the gym for 3-4 hours, but that's not the case. Squatting daily should take you about 30 minutes. The rest of the workout should take you 30-45 minutes. So, you're looking at 60-75 minutes in the gym on a daily basis, which is probably similar to what you spend there now.

That schedule will only work, though, if you keep your nose to the grindstone. Don't stand around, don't text, and don't talk to your buddy for 15 minutes. If you have a busy schedule like I do, you need to shut up and get to work.

We're not just doing squats every day, we're doing heavy squats every day. And by heavy, I mean you're going to try to hit your one-rep max whenever you can.

This sounds tough, and it is, but it's extremely effective. "You're going to see a lot of results. Not just physically, but mentally," says Broz. "I believe that squatting every day is not going to build your character, but it will reveal your character. You're truly going to find out what you're made of."

There are no days off in this trainer. If you want to do it, you're going to need a hardcore mindset.


Although you don't need any of this equipment to squat every day, purchasing some may help you get the most out of this trainer. Here's what I suggest:

Weightlifting shoes

Weightlifting shoes have a raised heel and a hard sole. A raised heel can be helpful because most people lack the ankle mobility to squat deep without their heels coming off the ground. Hard soles are even more important, though, because it's almost impossible to squat well if your feet are squishing into a soft surface.

If you can't afford weightlifting shoes, then make sure whatever shoes you're squatting in have hard, flat soles. Chuck Taylors work pretty well. To simulate a raised heel, put your heels on a thin weight plate with your toes on the floor. That may not work for max-effort squats, but it will help you work on your positioning so your lower back, knees, and ankles end up in the right places.

Flat-soled shoes

One of the variations you'll do in the next 30 days is a powerlifting-style squat. To do this type of squat well, perform them in shoes that have hard, flat soles. You don't necessarily need to go buy shoes with a flat sole, but make sure you're not squatting in shoes that have thick, high, or soft soles. The closer your feet are to solid ground, the better.

Weight Belt

A weight belt is one of the most important things in your gym bag, especially if you want to be the proud owner of a big-ass squat. I suggest getting a thick, leather belt that will hold up for a lot of uses.

Knee-wraps or sleeves

Although I prefer knee wraps, some people may prefer sleeves. Knee wraps or sleeves can offer some fantastic bounce out of the hole. They'll also help keep your knees warm and protected under heavy loads.


I know a lot of people will think that squatting daily will lead to overtraining. But, do you really know what overtraining is? Most people will never take themselves to that level. Most people don't really know what it means to be overtrained, which is a chronic condition that's the result of exercising far beyond your recovery capacity for a long period of time.

If you say daily squatting is inherently overtraining, I'm going to tell you that it's not. I've been doing this program for more than 300 days straight. Broz has been squatting every day since 1996. Like I said, squatting is a fundamental human movement, not something to fear.

"The thing is, nobody is built with an owner's manual," says Broz. "Nobody knows what they're capable of. Why can't you squat every day? Have you tried it? How do you know you're not capable of something more?"

"Why can't you squat every day? Have you tried it? How do you know you're not capable of something more?"

Broz is right. Once you try squatting daily, you'll learn to embrace it, and you'll make consistent progress—fast.

The human body is an adaptive machine. "I believe that anybody can adapt to a program," Broz says. "Over time, you add weight, and you make progress."


This program doesn't discriminate. It's for men, it's for women, it's for anybody with a hardcore mindset. But I guarantee that something will happen to you over the next 30 days. You're not going to want to stop. When you get into the rhythm of squatting every day, anything less feels like you're not working hard enough.

"You're going to see how it feels to really challenge yourself," says Broz. "After a while, it's not going to be a physical challenge anymore because your body will adapt to the program. It's going to be a mental thing. Can you get up in the morning and get under a bar? The battle is in your attitude."

You have to go after it. You have be a freak in the gym. How you perform your squats will carry over to your deadlift, your overhead press, your bench press, and much more. If you want to be physically stronger, you need to tackle this program.

Check out the other overview pages next, and get ready to work!

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Main | Program | Nutrition/Supplementation | Variations | History of the Squat | Get Started