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Ask The Siege

"What Do You Think About Deadstop Training?"

Ask The Siege: What Do You Think About Deadstop Training?

Deadstop training cuts the ''bounce'' from your reps. Learn how it can help you increase your force output and build raw strength!
Q

What's Your Opinion on Deadstop Training? Should I Do It?

If you walk into a commercial gym on Monday, "International Chest Day," you'll typically see four or five guys bouncing the bar off their chests and then running around for high-fives. These are the same dudes who probably brag about the 405-pound, 5-rep deadlift they bounced off the floor. They might brag about some big numbers, but if you ask them to do pause-reps, their weight would probably drop by at least 50 pounds.

Bounce-reps work because of the stretch reflex, also called reactive strength, or the release of stored energy. Think of the small squat you do before you jump. That squat stores energy in your muscles and tendons so they can act like springs when you jump. Basketball players with short calves and long Achilles tendons are genetically gifted in reactive forces. Their legs are really good at storing kinetic energy. The bar bouncing from the chest or the floor gives your body time to store energy and use it to push or pull. It might be easier, but you're only cheating yourself.

Deadstop training, which basically involves a full pause at the bottom of any rep, removes reactive strength from your training. It cuts the bounce from your reps, and it can help you build a significant amount of force production power and raw strength.

Use the Force

To do a heavy lift well, it's crucial to increase your force output. Force = Mass x Acceleration, but how can we put that equation to practical use? There are two key components in force: your central nervous system (CNS) and motor units. The lighter and easier a weight is to move, the fewer motor units your CNS turns on to move the weight. We have to learn to retrain our CNS to fire all motor units at the same time. Every knuckle-headed trainer will talk to you about the mind-muscle connection and how you need to squeeze, but the truth is we are not training the mind, we are training our CNS to adapt to stimulation.

Whether you're lifting 135 pounds or 500, all your motor units should receive the "Go!" signal. Watch some of the top deadlifters doing their warm-ups. They never haphazardly lift the weight; they fire quick, fast, and hard even when the bar is loaded with only 135 pounds. No matter the load, the speed of the lift almost never changes. Your goal is to move the weight from point A to point B as quickly as possible.

Deadstop Training

Here's where force production and stretch reflex come to blows. If you use deadstop training techniques, your stretch reflex can't help you. What's left is just you, your muscles, and the force they can produce against the load. If you're at the bottom of a squat and count for three seconds before you try to stand back up, your legs have nothing to rely on but their force output. To some, that's the true measure of strength.

Even if you're not a strength "purist," you can benefit from deadstop training. Your muscles get bigger and stronger and your CNS gets a new challenge. Here are some ways to apply deadstop training to your regimen:

METHOD 1 Pin Press + Floor Press

Since we started with bench press, it's probably important that I mention it again. Both the pin press and floor press are simple, but they're important. The point of both of these lifts is to pause at the bottom of each rep so that any stored energy is eliminated. Because of this, you may have to drop the weight significantly. If this is the case, the unfortunate truth is you've been cheating yourself out of gains the whole time you've been training.

To do the pin press, set up a squat cage so the pins are just above your chest. The exercise is performed almost exclusively for concentric contraction. Once I am under the bar, I explode up as fast as possible and set the bar back down on the pins. Don't waste energy slowly lowering the bar—I pretty much do a controlled drop. After the bar is on the pins, release the bar, drop your hands to the side, and prepare for the next rep. Repeat until your set is complete.

The goal is to create power so there are no light sets of 12 or 15 reps. I do sets of four and work my way down to sets of one or two. I suggest starting with five sets and working your way to a heavy set of two reps.

Floor presses are slightly different. Lie on the floor in a squat rack and place pins so you can reach up and unrack the bar while flat on your back. Lower the bar until your arms are rested on the ground, pause for a count of three, and then explode up. Make sure that the pause is long enough to release the stored energy.

METHOD 2 Box Squats

These same techniques can be used very effectively on other muscle groups. Although leg training might come second to the almighty bench press for many gym-goers, it shouldn't. Set up a box at parallel depth and position it so you can sit on it without impeding your movement pattern. When you come down to sit on the box, keep your body tight, but stop completely. Wait a couple seconds to release your stored energy, and then power yourself back up.

The forces built up during a heavy squat are tremendous, and eliminating the stretch reflex will increase your power output tremendously. It will also increase the size of your legs because they will actually be doing a lot more work.

METHOD 3 Deadlift

It's called the deadlift for a reason: It's done from a dead stop! Just as the pin press and box squat, the point of this movement is to completely stop once the weight hits the floor. You can take a moment to re-adjust your grip, your stance, your back angle, and then pull again. If you have to go lighter, do it. Your CNS will function better and you'll see a lot better gains faster.

Pro Tips

I only practice these principles on major compound movements, but there is no reason you can't apply them to any muscle group that needs a little kick in the ass. Remember, we are retraining our CNS to fire as many motor units as possible regardless of the weight. More motor units mean more power.

If you need more proof, look at the small Olympic weight lifters that can out-lift giant bodybuilders. Their explosiveness is off the charts. Now think what could happen if you combine the best of both worlds!


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About The Author

In addition to his day-to-day activities, Noah Siegel is also a personal trainer, fitness model, and sponsored athlete for Optimum Nutrition.

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TomBremner

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TomBremner

theres nothing really new or revolutionary about this. touch and go deadlifts are almost useless. this is basiclly saying do proper form and use things like pause squats and heavy lockouts. this is one of the only articles on this site i actually support. noah, i am proud. you go girl

Jul 25, 2013 6:49pm | report
 
TrimLines

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TrimLines

Thanks my man

Jul 26, 2013 6:16am | report
solarphoenix

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solarphoenix

Thing is that many guys don't really know a lot about training. I ran into this type of training about 4 years back with Chad Waterbury. It is the exact same concept of using force to produce better results.

Jul 29, 2013 10:22am | report
jtortorich

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jtortorich

Just started using pause reps in my workouts and I can already tell that different muscle fibers are being used when training this way, due to the new soreness.

Jul 25, 2013 7:33pm | report
 
weltermike

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weltermike

Talking all about the Strength Curve in this article. Educating myself about the strength curve and learning how to manipulate it to the way you want to lift is great for your body and muscles and GAINS. Every serious lifter should know what the strength curve is and how to make it work for them.

Jul 25, 2013 8:32pm | report
 
lydzie102

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lydzie102

It's called the DEADlift. I can't believe the amount of times that I've seen people bounce the bar off the floor without even hip hinging. The same thing with bounce the bar off your chest when Bench Pressing.

Jul 26, 2013 5:39am | report
 
mgeppel

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mgeppel

I also really enjoyed this article, I've been using the rest pause method for a little over a month and have noticed significant gains. I couldn't help but laugh at two teenagers yesterday at the gym bouncing the weight so hard off the floor the trainers had to come over and tell them to knock it off.

Jul 26, 2013 7:51am | report
 
jwethall

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jwethall

I'm going to start implementing this immediately. Also, what are your thoughts on rack pulls? I'm trying to hit my back more and glutes less...I'm starting to turn into buttzilla.

Jul 26, 2013 12:21pm | report
 
TrimLines

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TrimLines

I love rack pulls, a lot of times I get a really achy lower back from too much off the ground work or deep squats. I find generally I can still work around this working off the rack at about knee level. Killer on the lower back lats and midback. I feel like they also get you used to moving massive amounts of weight

Jul 26, 2013 1:43pm | report
jwethall

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jwethall

Totally. Thanks for the validation!

Jul 26, 2013 6:42pm | report
ARES802

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ARES802

Not to mention that rack pulls are also a nice ego boost.

Aug 4, 2013 11:46am | report
SugarNation

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SugarNation

This is a monthly column, so feel free to offer any questions for Noah to consider as the basis for upcoming installments of "Ask 'The Siege.'"

Jul 26, 2013 10:54pm | report
 
cgraham531

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cgraham531

This is one sexy article.

Jul 27, 2013 12:50am | report
 
Jeriess

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Jeriess

Gave this a go with my chest today can tell its doing something different with this new pain!!!

Jul 27, 2013 1:09am | report
 
jamezcatt

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jamezcatt

I think this will help.

Jul 27, 2013 4:02pm | report
 
RussellBG

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RussellBG

Im definitely going to start using this right away for more than just the obvious one which is deadlifts. It make a lot of sense. Good article.

Article Rated:
Jul 28, 2013 4:02am | report
 
Paud

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Paud

Great article, will definitely include this tips in my workout although I am not fan of bouncing the bar. Thanks.

Jul 28, 2013 5:48am | report
 
Jimmythrash

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Jimmythrash

I find the explosive bit hard to do personally I feel like something might rip on the inside , but the dead stop thing I've always employed though without pins or racks , complete pause then engage the motion ( Cept deadlifts their my jam), it makes the rep harder. Lifting heavy shet ain't suppose to be easy
Good article

Jul 28, 2013 8:57am | report
 
jjakob666

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jjakob666

Many people confuse a jerking movement with explosiveness. Jerking will definitely cause internal ripping of joints ligaments, or muscle away from bone. Explosive is actually starting slow for the first inch or two then concentration all power into lifting the bar as fast as possible to just before lockout. When using very heavy weight you feel the explosiveness even though the bar rises very slowly.

Aug 5, 2013 8:24pm | report
tranimalmode

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tranimalmode

Dumbbell Dead Stop Rows are amazing!

Jul 28, 2013 1:20pm | report
 
BioFit67

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BioFit67

Good article. I've recently been implementing this type of technique into my routine with great results. It is amazing how quickly the CNS can adapt resulting in greater power output week after week. Thanks.

Jul 29, 2013 5:59am | report
 
Lucas1969

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Lucas1969

Never heard of this.............i am not sure if it a good technique?
Having serious doubts...........

Jul 29, 2013 6:47am | report
 
TrimLines

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TrimLines

Your doubts will quickly diminish once you give this a try

Jul 29, 2013 9:12am | report
a11

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a11

I support the idea behind this article.

Jul 29, 2013 8:54am | report
 
Thai_Clinch

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Thai_Clinch

It took this article to remember myself why i was stalling. Time to get back to CNS training. im friend. time to flip it over. Great article and great reminder !

Jul 29, 2013 11:22am | report
 
Showing 1 - 25 of 41 Comments

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